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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2017-2018

Last Updated 2015-07-01

Curriculum and Instruction MEd



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Curriculum

The Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction program requires a minimum of 33 credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree; minimum credit hour requirements vary by track. Students from all tracks must complete the required 15 credit hours of core courses. The Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction requires that all students complete a Capstone Research Project.  The Capstone is a course-based action research study (i.e., application and analysis of the effectiveness of research-based best practices in the classroom). Additional course requirements vary by track. 

This section describes the elements of the curriculum that are in common for all of the tracks.

Required Courses

Core—15 Credit Hours

All students must take the Curriculum and Instruction core, regardless of their chosen specialization.

  • EDG 6935 Introductory Seminar in Teacher Leadership* (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6223 Curriculum Theory, Organization and Policy (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6472 Data-driven Decision Making for Instruction** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6233 Introduction to Action Research and Analysis of Classroom Practice** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6635 Capstone: Action Research in Teacher Leadership (3 credit hours) 

*Must be taken in first semester of program.

**Prerequisites for the Capstone course. 

Students complete a Capstone Research Project at the end of the program. EDF 6635 is offered in spring semester only. Students must complete an Intent to Graduate Form the semester prior to enrolling in EDF 6635. 


Track Curriculum: Art Education

The Art Education track in the Curriculum and Instruction MEd program requires 15 credit hours of core courses, including completion of a capstone research project or thesis. In addition, students take 21 credit hours of specialization courses.

Required Courses—36-39 Credit Hours

Core—15 Credit Hours

  • EDG 6935 Introductory Seminar in Teacher Leadership* (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6223 Curriculum Theory, Organization and Policy (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6472 Data-Driven Decision Making for Instruction** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6233 Introduction to Action Research and Analysis of Classroom Practice** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6635 Action Research and Inquiry in Teacher Leadership (3 credit hours) or IDS 6971 Thesis (6 credit hours)

* Must be taken in first semester in the program.

**Prerequisites to the Capstone.  

Student completes either a Capstone Research Project or Thesis at the end of the program.  EDF 6635 is offered in spring semester only.

Specialization—21 Credit Hours

Students take the following courses:

  • ARE 6450 K-12 Instructional Materials (3 credit hours)
  • ARE 6666 Arts Advocacy (3 credit hours)
  • ARE 6748 Advanced Research Seminar in Art Education (3 credit hours)
  • ARE 6747 Assessment Seminar in Art Education (3 credit hours)
  • ARE 6905 Research Trends in Art Education (3 credit hours)

Choose two of the following elective courses with adviser approval:

  • ARE 5251 Art for Exceptionalities (3 credit hours)
  • ARE 5454 Studio Experiences in Art Education (3 credit hours; may be repeated for credit up to 3 times)
  • ARE 6195 Teaching Art Appreciation with Interdisciplinary Strategies (3 credit hours)
  • ARE 6748 Advanced Research Seminar in Art Education (3 credit hours; may be used in the degree program a maximum of 2 times only when course content is different)
  • ARE 6905 Research Trends in Art Education (3 credit hours; may be repeated for credit)
  • ART studio courses approved by adviser

Track Curriculum: Curriculum Leadership

The Curriculum and Leadership track in the Master of Education (MEd) Curriculum and Instruction program requires 15 credit hours of core courses, including completion of a capstone research project. In addition, students take 18 credit hours of specialization courses.

Required Courses—33-36 Credit Hours

Core—15 Credit Hours

  • EDG 6935 Introductory Seminar in Teacher Leadership* (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6223 Curriculum Theory, Organization and Policy (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6472 Data-Driven Decision Making for Instruction** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6233 Introduction to Action Research and Analysis of Classroom Practice** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6635 Capstone: Action Research in Teacher Leadership (3 credit hours) 

*Must be taken in first semester of program.

**Prerequisites for the Capstone. 

Students complete a Capstone Research Project at the end of the program. Students must complete an Intent to Graduate form the semester prior to enrolling in ED 6635. EDF 6635 is offered in spring semester only.

Specialization—18 Credit Hours

Students take the following courses:

  • ESE 6217 Curriculum Design (3 credit hours)
  • ESE 6416 Curriculum Evaluation (3 credit hours)
  • EGI 6245 Curriculum and Instruction for Advanced, Gifted and Talented Learners (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6259 Learning Theories Applied to Leadership in Teaching Practice (3 credit hours)

Choose two of the following elective courses with adviser approval:

  • EDF 6517 Perspectives on Education (3 credit hours)
  • EME 5050 Fundamentals of Technology for Educators or EME 6602 Integration of Technology into the Curriculum (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6602 Integration of Technology into the Curriculum (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6886 Multicultural Education (3 credit hours)
  • Other electives as approved by adviser and program coordinator (up to 6 credit hours) 

Track Curriculum: Educational Technology

The Educational Technology track in the Master of Education (MEd) in Curriculum and Instruction program requires 15 credit hours of core courses, including completion of a capstone research project. In addition, students take 18 credit hours of specialization courses.

Required Courses—33-36 Credit Hours

Core—15 Credit Hours

  • EDG 6935 Introductory Seminar in Teacher Leadership* (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6223 Curriculum Theory, Organization and Policy (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6472 Data-Driven Decision Making for Instruction** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6233 Introduction to Action Research and Analysis of Classroom Practice** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6635 Capstone: Action Research in Teacher Leadership (3 credit hours) 

* Must be taken in first semester in the program.

** Prerequisites to the Capstone.

Students complete a Capstone Action Research Project at the end of the program.  EDF 6635 is offered in spring semester only.

Specialization—18 Credit Hours

Students take the following courses:

  • EME 5050 Fundamentals of Technology for Educators (3 credit hours)
  • EME 5053 Electronic Resources for Education (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6405 Application Software for Educational Settings (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6507 Multimedia for Education and Training (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6602 Integration of Technology into the Curriculum (3 credit hours)

Choose one of the following courses:

  • EME 6055 Current Trends in Instructional Technology (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6062 Research in Instructional Technology (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6613 Instructional System Design (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6417 Interactive Online and Virtual Teaching Environments (3 credit hours; prerequisite is EME 6507)
  • EME 6458 Virtual Teaching and the Digital Educator (3 credit hours; prerequisite is EME 6417)

Track Curriculum: Gifted Education

The Gifted Education track in the Master of Education (MEd) in Curriculum and Instruction program requires 15 credit hours of core courses, including completion of a capstone research project. In addition, students take 18 credit hours of specialization courses.

Required Courses—33-36 Credit Hours

Core—15 Credit Hours

  • EDG 6935 Introductory Seminar in Teacher Leadership* (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6223 Curriculum Theory, Organization and Policy (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6472 Data-Driven Decision Making for Instruction** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6233 Introduction to Action Research and Analysis of Classroom Practice** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6635 Capstone: Action Research in Teacher Leadership (3 credit hours) 

* Must be taken in first semester in the program.

** Prerequisites for enrolling in Capstone. Students complete a Capstone Research Project at the end of the program. EDF 6635 is offered in spring semester only.

Specialization—18 Credit Hours 

  • EDF 6247 Developing Advanced Programs and Services: Acceleration and Enrichment for Academically and Intellectually Gifted Learners (3 credit hours)
  • EGI 6051 Understanding the Gifted/Talented Student (3 credit hours)
  • EGI 6245 Curriculum and Instruction for Teaching Advanced, Gifted and Talented Learners (3 credit hours)
  • EGI 6246 Education of Special Populations of Gifted Students (3 credit hours)
  • EGI 6417 Guidance and Counseling Strategies for Teachers of Gifted and Talented Individuals (3 credit hours)
  • EGI 6305 Theory and Development of Creativity (3 credit hours)

Track Curriculum: Global, International and Comparative Education

The Global, International and Comparative Education track in the Master of Education (MEd) in Curriculum and Instruction program requires 15 credit hours of core courses, including completion of a capstone research project. In addition, students take 21 credit hours of specialization courses.

Required Courses—33-36 Credit Hours

Core—15 Credit Hours

  • EDG 6935 Introductory Seminar in Teacher Leadership* (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6223 Curriculum Theory, Organization and Policy (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6472 Data-Driven Decision Making for Instruction** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6233 Introduction to Action Research and Analysis of Classroom Practice** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6635 Capstone: Action Research in Teacher Leadership (3 credit hours) 

* Must be taken in first semester in the program.

**Prerequisites to the Capstone.

Students complete a Capstone Research Project at the end of the program. EDF 6635 is offered in spring semester only.

Specialization—21 Credit Hours

Students take the following courses:

  • EDF 6809 Introduction to Comparative and International Education (3 credit hours)
  • SSE 5391 Global Education: Theory and Practice (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6855 Equitable Educational Opportunity and Life Chances: A Cross-National Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • EDS 6365 Education and National Development (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6886 Multicultural Education (3 credit hours)

Select two of the following courses:

  • EDG 6775 Exploring Global Educational Issues in International Contexts (3 credit hours)
  • EEC 6606 Global issues in Early Childhood (3 credit hours)
  • Other graduate courses with the program director's approval

Track Curriculum: Intervention Specialist

The Intervention Specialist track in the Master in Education Teacher Leadership program requires 15 credit hours of core courses, including completion of a capstone research project. In addition, students take 18 credit hours of specialization courses.

Required Courses—33-36 Credit Hours

Core—15 Credit Hours

  • EDG 6935 Introductory Seminar in Teacher Leadership* (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6223 Curriculum Theory, Organization and Policy (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6472 Data-Driven Decision Making for Instruction** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6233 Introduction to Action Research and Analysis of Classroom Practice** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6635 Capstone: Action Research in Teacher Leadership (3 credit hours)

* Must be taken in first semester in the program.

**Prerequisites to the Capstone.

Students complete a Capstone Research Project at the end of the program. EDF 6635 is offered in spring semester only.

Specialization—18 Credit Hours

  • EEX 6218 Diagnostic Assessment and Intervention Planning in Exceptional Education (3 credit hours)
  • MAE 6517 Diagnosis/Remediation of Difficulties in Mathematics for the Classroom Teacher (3 credit hours)
  • RED 5517 Classroom Diagnosis and Development of Reading Proficiencies (3 credit hours)
  • SPS 6700 Advanced Psychoeducation and Data-Based Decision Making (3 credit hours)
  • EGI 6246 Education of Special Populations of Gifted Students (3 credit hours)
  • Electives as approved by the program adviser ( 3 credit hours)

Track Curriculum: Supporting High Needs Populations

The Supporting High Needs Populations track in the Master of Education (MEd) Curriculum and Instruction program requires 15 credit hours of core courses, including completion of a capstone research project. In addition, students take 18 credit hours of specialization courses.

Required Courses—33-36 Credit Hours

Core—15 Credit Hours

  • EDG 6935 Introductory Seminar in Teacher Leadership* (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6223 Curriculum Theory, Organization and Policy (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6472 Data-Driven Decision Making for Instruction** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6233 Introduction to Action Research and Analysis of Classroom Practice** (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6635 Capstone: Action Research in Teacher Leadership (3 credit hours) 

*Must be taken in first semester of program.

**Prerequisites for the Capstone. 

Students complete a Capstone Research Project at the end of the program. Students must complete an Intent to Graduate form the semester prior to enrolling in ED 6635. EDF 6635 is offered in spring semester only.

Specialization—18 Credit Hours

Students take the following courses:

  • EDF 6725 Critical Issues in the Study of High Needs Populations (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6155 Lifespan Human Development and Learning (3 credit hours)

Choose four of the following elective courses with adviser approval:

  • CCJ 6485 Issues in Justice Policy (3 credit hours)
  • ECW 6067 History of Career Education in the United States (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6206 Challenges of Classroom Diversity (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6855 Equitable Educational Opportunity and Life Changes: A Cross-National Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6886 Multicultural Education (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6636 Impact of Social Contexts on Teaching and Learning (3 credit hours)
  • EEX 6342 Seminar: Critical Issues in Special Education (3 credit hours)
  • EGI 6246 Education of Special Populations of Gifted Students (3 credit hours)
  • RED 5147 Developmental Reading (3 credit hours)
  • SPS 5605 Building and Improving Relationship and Emotional Intelligence (3 credit hours)
  • SPS 6700 Advanced Psychoeducation and Data-Based Decision Making (3 credit hours)

Financial Support

Students with qualifying assistantships or university-wide fellowships will receive financial packages that include an assistantship or fellowship stipend, tuition remission, and health insurance. Qualifying fellowships are accompanied by tuition waivers. Qualifying assistantships include single appointments of at least .50 FTE (20 hrs/week) or two appointments of at least .25 FTE (10 hrs/week). Tuition remission is in the form of either tuition waivers or tuition payments that cover in-state (resident) tuition. Non-resident students with financial packages are not charged out-of-state tuition or the non-resident financial aid fee.

For additional information about funding for graduate school, please visit the College of Graduate Studies Funding website at www.funding.graduate.ucf.edu/.

If you are interested in applying for loans or externally funded need-based awards, visit the Office of Student Financial Assistance website at finaid.ucf.edu and complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is available January 1 each year.

Financial Support Requirements

Graduate students must meet certain requirements each term that they receive fellowships or assistantships. In brief, to receive and maintain these types of financial support packages, a student must:

  • maintain good academic standing
  • be enrolled full time

A more detailed description of the financial support requirements can be found in the Financial Information > Financial Support requirements of the current Graduate Catalog at www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu.

University Fellowships

Most university fellowships are reserved for incoming degree-seeking graduate students who plan to enroll full time. For a listing of merit-based fellowships that are offered through the UCF College of Graduate Studies, as well as a listing of various general graduate funding opportunities, see the UCF Graduate Fellowships section of the College of Graduate Studies Funding website at funding.graduate.ucf.edu/fellowships/.

Presentation Fellowship

The College of Graduate Studies provides presentation fellowships for students to present their research or comparable creative activity at a professional meeting or conference. To review the award requirements and apply online, see funding.graduate.ucf.edu/presentation/.

Graduate Assistantships

Graduate assistantship appointments offer opportunities for students to engage in research, teaching, and other projects during their graduate study. These are paid appointments that promote the missions of the University. For eligibility, students must be accepted as a graduate student in a degree program and be enrolled full-time.

For more information concerning graduate assistantships, see the Financial Information > Graduate Assistantships section of the current Graduate Catalog at www.graduate.catalog.ucf.edu or talk to the Graduate Program Director to learn about specific eligibility and application guidelines.

Graduate Teaching

Graduate students may be appointed as graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) to carry out responsibilities as classroom teachers (instructors of record), co-teachers or classroom assistants, graders, lab assistants, or other roles directly related to classroom instruction. Mandatory training requirements must be met for a student to be hired in the position of Graduate Teaching Associate, Assistant or Grader. The training, offered by UCF’s Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, covers course design, learning theories, ethics, and other topics relevant to preparing GTAs for their responsibilities. See www.students.graduate.ucf.edu > Graduate Teaching > GTA Information for training requirements and registration instructions.

Students who are non-native speakers of English and do not have a degree from a U.S. institution must pass the SPEAK test before they will be permitted to teach as Graduate Teaching Associates (position code 9183) or Graduate Teaching Assistants (position code 9184). The SPEAK test is not required for students who will be appointed as a Graduate Teaching Grader (position code 9187). Additional information including how to register for the test can be accessed through the GTA Information section of the College of Graduate Studies student website.

Graduate Student Associations

For information on graduate student associations for graduate students in the College of Education and Human Performance visit the Clubs and Organizations webpage on the College of Education and Human Performance website.

Professional Development

Instructor Training and Development

The Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning (FCTL) promotes excellence in all levels of teaching at the University of Central Florida. They offer several programs for the professional development of Graduate Teaching Assistants at UCF.

GTA Training (mandatory for employment as a GTA)

This training provides information and resources for students who will be instructors in a two-day workshop. The seminars cover a variety of topics, including course development, learning theories, lecturing, and academic freedom. Those interested in additional training can also attend an optional training session that normally follows the mandatory training.

Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program

This certificate program (12-weeks) consists of group and individualized instruction by Faculty Center staff and experienced UCF professors. Textbooks and materials are provided.

For more information: www.fctl.ucf.edu > Events > GTA Programs or call 407-823-3544.

Graduate Research Forum

The Graduate Research Forum will feature poster displays representing UCF’s diverse colleges and disciplines. It is an opportunity for students to showcase their research and creative projects and to receive valuable feedback from faculty judges. Awards for best poster presentation in each category will be given and all participants will receive recognition.

The College of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Student Association invite all UCF students, community, and employers to attend the Graduate Research Forum. For more information www.graduate.ucf.edu/ResearchForum.

Graduate Excellence Awards

Each year, the College of Graduate Studies offers graduate students who strive for academic and professional excellence the opportunity to be recognized for their work. The award categories include the following:

Award for Excellence by a Graduate Teaching Assistant – This award is for students who provide teaching support and assistance under the direction of a lead teacher. This award focuses on the extent and quality of the assistance provided by the student to the lead instructor and the students in the class. (Not intended for students who are instructor of record)

Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Teaching – This award is for students who serve as instructors of record and have independent classroom responsibilities. The focus of this award is on the quality of the student’s teaching and the academic contributions of those activities.

Award for the Outstanding Master’s Thesis – It recognizes graduate students for excellence in the master's thesis. The focus of this award is on the quality and contribution of the student's thesis research. Excellence of the master's thesis may be demonstrated by evidence such as, but not limited to: publications in refereed journals, awards and recognitions from professional organizations, and praise from faculty members and other colleagues in the field.

For the nomination process and eligibility criteria, see the College of Graduate Studies websitewww.graduate.ucf.edu/GradAwards.

Other

Students should take opportunities to present a poster or a topic of research at a conference. To obtain financial support to present at a conference (other than through your program) or to engage in comparable creative activity at a professional meeting, visit the Graduate Presentation Fellowship section at www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/fellowship/funding.

For information about the Council of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS) thesis and dissertation awards, see their website:www.csgs.org > Awards.

For grant-proposal writing resources: uwc.ucf.edu/gradwriting.php.

For information regarding clinical experiences for students in the education discipline, visit the Office of Clinical Experiences webpage on the College of Education and Human Performance's website.

Job Search

For more information on employment opportunities visit the Employment webpage on the College of Education and Human Performance website.

Forms

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s work and presenting it as your own. Any ideas, data, text, media or materials taken from another source (either written or verbal) must be fully acknowledged.a) A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without acknowledgment.b) A student must give credit to the originality of others whenever:

  1. Directly quoting another person's actual words, whether oral or written;
  2. Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theories;
  3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others, whether oral or written;
  4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
  5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgment.

When using the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, students must give credit to the original source at the location or place in the document where that source's material is found as well as provide bibliographic information at the end of the document. When students are verbally discussing the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, they must give credit to the original source at the time they speak about that source. In this manner, students must make clear (so there is no doubt) within their written or verbal materials, which parts are gained from other sources, and which are their own original ideas, theories, formulas, graphics, and pictures.The Office of Student Conduct has a set of criteria that determines if students are in violation of plagiarism. This set of criteria may be set to a higher standard in graduate programs. Therefore, a student may not be found in violation of plagiarism by the Office of Student Conduct, but a professor or program requiring higher standards of attribution and citation may find a student in violation of plagiarism and administer program level sanctions. The standard in doctoral programs should be the highest as students earning these degrees are expected to be experts in their fields and producing independent work that contributes knowledge to their discipline.

Example of Material that has been appropriately cited:

Paraphrased Material

Source: Osborne, Richard, ed. How to Grow Annuals. 2nd ed. Menlo Park: Lane, 1974. Print. Page 24: As a recent authority has pointed out, for a dependable long-blooming swatch of soft blue in your garden, ageratum is a fine choice. From early summer until frost, ageratum is continuously covered with clustered heads of fine, silky, fringed flowers in dusty shades of lavender-blue, lavender-pink or white. The popular dwarf varieties grow in mounds six to twelve inches high and twelve inches across; they make fine container plants. Larger types grow up to three feet tall. Ageratum makes an excellent edging.

Use and Adaptation of the Material:

You can depend on ageratum if you want some soft blue in your garden. It blooms through the summer and the flowers, soft, small, and fringed, come in various shades of lavender. The small varieties which grow in mounds are very popular, especially when planted in containers. There are also larger varieties. Ageratum is good as a border plant (Osborne 24).

Explanation:

The writer has done a good job of paraphrasing what could be considered common knowledge (available in a number of sources), but because the structure and progression of detail is someone else’s, the writer has acknowledged the source. This the writer can do at the end of the paragraph since he or she has not used the author’s words.

The above example was provided by Northwestern University.

Northwestern University, Sept. 2016. “Academic Integrity: A Basic Guide.” Accessed 20 September 2017.

For more information about Academic Honesty, Click here.

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