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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2017-2018

Program Info

Last Updated 2016-01-21

Nanotechnology MS



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Curriculum

The Nanotechnology MS program consists of 30 credit hours of graduate courses including 12 credit hours of required (core) courses in nanotechnology, 9 credit hours of elective courses in physics, engineering, chemistry, biology or other related field, 3 credit hours of independent study, and 6 credit hours of thesis research.

From the core courses in nanotechnology and elective courses in related science/engineering areas, students will gain basic and broader understanding of the most advanced techniques, developments and applications of nanoscale materials and devices. From the independent study and thesis research training, the students will gain hands-on experiences to work on problems and product development involving nanoscience and nanotechnology.


Required Courses—15 Credit Hours

Core Courses—12 Credit Hours

Select four courses from the following list of courses.

  • IDS 6250 Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6254 Nanofabrication and Characterization (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6252 Biomedical Nanotechnology (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6255 Nanotechnology in Energy and Sustainability (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6253 Bioanalytical Technology (3 credit hours)

Independent Study—3 Credit Hours

Students will take 3 credit hours of independent study, resulting in a required research report of independent learning experience. Independent Study must have a formally defined core of knowledge to be learned by the student. In accordance with the policy of the College of Graduate Studies, the core of knowledge to be learned by the student must be specified in written form and approved by the student, the instructor, and the program coordinator prior to enrollment in Independent Study. 

Elective Courses—9 Credit Hours

  • EMA 5586 Photovoltaic Solar Energy Materials (3 credit hours)
  • EMA 5060 Polymer Science and Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EMA 6518 Transmission Electron Microscopy (3 credit hours)
  • EMA 5505 Scanning Electron Microscopy (3 credit hours)
  • EMA 6605 Materials Processing Techniques (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 5704 Physics of Nanoelectronic Devices (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 5933 Selected Topics in Biophysics of Macromolecules (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 5312 Light Matter Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 6938 ST: Photonic Polymer Materials (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 5127 Foundation of Bio-Imaging Science (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5225 Molecular Biology of Disease (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5238 Immunobiology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5236 Cancer Biology (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6251 Computation, Simulation and Modeling in Nanotechnology (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6256 Principles of Nanostructure Quantum Well, Wires, and Dots (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6257 Fundamentals of Nano Biophysics (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6258 Advanced Materials for Rechargeable Batteries (3 credit hours)

Thesis—6 Credit Hours

Students will conduct and complete an independent thesis research project under the supervision of a NanoScience Technology Center faculty. The student will defend the thesis at the completion of the study. Students will gain hands-on research experiences on nanomaterial synthesis, nanostructure fabrication and characterization, and application development in their interested areas.

  • IDS 6971 (6 credit hours)

Financial Support

Graduate students may receive financial assistance through fellowships, assistantships, tuition support, or loans. For more information, see Funding for Graduate School, which describes the types of financial assistance available at UCF and provides general guidance in planning your graduate finances. The Financial Information section of the Graduate Catalog is another key resource.

Fellowships

Fellowships are awarded based on academic merit to highly qualified students. They are paid to students through the Office of Student Financial Assistance, based on instructions provided by the College of Graduate Studies. Fellowships are given to support a student’s graduate study and do not have a work obligation. For more information, see Fellowships, which includes descriptions of UCF fellowships and what you should do to be considered for a fellowship. 

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s work and presenting it as your own. Any ideas, data, text, media or materials taken from another source (either written or verbal) must be fully acknowledged.a) A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without acknowledgment.b) A student must give credit to the originality of others whenever:

  1. Directly quoting another person's actual words, whether oral or written;
  2. Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theories;
  3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others, whether oral or written;
  4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
  5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgment.

When using the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, students must give credit to the original source at the location or place in the document where that source's material is found as well as provide bibliographic information at the end of the document. When students are verbally discussing the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, they must give credit to the original source at the time they speak about that source. In this manner, students must make clear (so there is no doubt) within their written or verbal materials, which parts are gained from other sources, and which are their own original ideas, theories, formulas, graphics, and pictures.The Office of Student Conduct has a set of criteria that determines if students are in violation of plagiarism. This set of criteria may be set to a higher standard in graduate programs. Therefore, a student may not be found in violation of plagiarism by the Office of Student Conduct, but a professor or program requiring higher standards of attribution and citation may find a student in violation of plagiarism and administer program level sanctions. The standard in doctoral programs should be the highest as students earning these degrees are expected to be experts in their fields and producing independent work that contributes knowledge to their discipline.

Example of Material that has been appropriately cited:

Paraphrased Material

Source: Osborne, Richard, ed. How to Grow Annuals. 2nd ed. Menlo Park: Lane, 1974. Print. Page 24: As a recent authority has pointed out, for a dependable long-blooming swatch of soft blue in your garden, ageratum is a fine choice. From early summer until frost, ageratum is continuously covered with clustered heads of fine, silky, fringed flowers in dusty shades of lavender-blue, lavender-pink or white. The popular dwarf varieties grow in mounds six to twelve inches high and twelve inches across; they make fine container plants. Larger types grow up to three feet tall. Ageratum makes an excellent edging.

Use and Adaptation of the Material:

You can depend on ageratum if you want some soft blue in your garden. It blooms through the summer and the flowers, soft, small, and fringed, come in various shades of lavender. The small varieties which grow in mounds are very popular, especially when planted in containers. There are also larger varieties. Ageratum is good as a border plant (Osborne 24).

Explanation:

The writer has done a good job of paraphrasing what could be considered common knowledge (available in a number of sources), but because the structure and progression of detail is someone else’s, the writer has acknowledged the source. This the writer can do at the end of the paragraph since he or she has not used the author’s words.

The above example was provided by Northwestern University.

Northwestern University, Sept. 2016. “Academic Integrity: A Basic Guide.” Accessed 20 September 2017.

For more information about Academic Honesty, Click here.

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