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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2017-2018

Program Info

Last Updated 2013-01-07

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages MA



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

We are pleased that you are joining our program!

This is an exciting time to be part of the TESOL community. With the unprecedented growth of speakers of English as an additional language in the world today, the need for language educators has increased as well. Our TESOL program, offered through the department of Modern Languages and Literatures at the University of Central Florida, is dynamic. It will equip you with the theoretical and pedagogical foundations required for the teaching of English as a second or foreign language.

Our faculty members are aware of the current demands of the profession.  We strive to provide you with solid knowledge in the areas of linguistics, the social and psychological factors in language acquisition, assessment, and curriculum design. At the same time, we seek to maintain a balance between coursework focusing on theory and on practice. At the end of the program, students will understand the nature of second language acquisition and will be familiar with the principles of language learning and teaching in a variety of social contexts. They will be able to read and interpret relevant research as they apply it to their own teaching practices. Students will also have the opportunity to evaluate existing teaching materials critically as they learn to develop their own.

Graduates of the program can expect to obtain jobs as English language educators and curriculum developers in the United States (ESL or ESOL) or English as a foreign language abroad (EFL). Many of our graduates are teaching in colleges, language institutes, and public schools. Our MA TESOL program also prepares students to pursue advanced doctoral degrees in the field by providing a thesis track option; most students, however, complete the non-thesis track because they are more interested in pedagogy than research.

General Information

Degree-seeking students in the TESOL program may elect to follow either of two courses of study: thesis (30 semester hours: 24 semester hours of core courses, 3 semester hours of electives, and 3 credit hours of TSL 6971 Thesis) or nonthesis (36 semester hours: 24 semester hours of core courses and 12 semester hours of electives).

All TSL courses require some type of final research project that allows students to propose, plan, research, develop, write, and/or present their research study with the ultimate goal being research applied to TESOL pedagogy to some degree. The TSL 6640 Research in Second Language is required and should be taken in the first semester of study. A final cumulative course, TSL 6642 Issues in Second Language Acquisition, is also required.

The thesis option is appropriate for those students wishing to research current issues in the discipline or eventually pursue a doctoral program in TESOL or related language field. Students wishing to pursue the thesis option should speak with the program director during the application process to seek approval and a recommendation for a thesis committee chairperson. Most students complete the nonthesis course of study so that they can focus more on course work related to specific aspects of TESOL, pedagogy, or education.

All students must take a comprehensive written examination covering the core TSL courses. This examination is normally taken in the last semester of graduate work and will be reviewed by members of the TESOL Graduate Committee. A student may take the comprehensive examination only twice. A second examination will not be given in the same semester in which the first attempt occurred.

Note:  LIN courses are offered through the English Department; TESOL students may register in these courses on a space-available arrangement; it is important to check the English Department’s schedule because these courses are not offered very often

Satisfactory Academic Performance

Satisfactory performance involves maintaining the standards of academic progress and professional integrity expected in a particular discipline or program. Failure to maintain these standards may result in termination of the student from the program.   

The university requires that students must maintain a graduate status GPA of at least 3.0 or higher in order to maintain graduate student status, receive financial assistance, and qualify for graduation. The graduate status GPA is the cumulative GPA of graduate courses taken since admission to the degree program. This graduation requirement for a minimum 3.0 GPA in all graduate courses completed since admission into the graduate program cannot be waived.” For more information please refer to the Graduate Catalog, www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu > Policies > General Policies > Academic Progress and Performance > Graduate GPA.

A program GPA below 3.00 at the end of any semester will result in a student being placed on “academic provisional” status. In this status, a student is not eligible for tuition waiver support or employment in a graduate position. The student is given the next nine hours of their program coursework to improve their GPA to 3.00 or better. Furthermore, exceeding 6 hours of C (in other words, more than two grades of C) or lower grades will result in removal from the program.

Retaking a course does not result in “grade forgiveness.”  All grades are a permanent part of the student’s graduate record and GPA at UCF.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Master’s students must complete at least 21 semester credits at UCF (Orlando or regional campuses). For completion of the degree, courses older than seven years cannot be applied toward a graduate plan of study.

Curriculum

The Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages MA program requires 30-36 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree dependent on whether students select a thesis or nonthesis option. The thesis option consists  of 30 credit hours that includes 24 credit hours of core courses, 3 credit hours of electives, and 3 credit hours of TSL 6971 Thesis. The nonthesis option requires 36 semester hours and includes 24 semester hours of core courses and 12 semester hours of electives. All students, both thesis and nonthesis, must take a written final comprehensive examination covering the core TSL courses.

Most students complete the nonthesis option so that they can focus more on course work related to specific aspects of TESOL, pedagogy, or education. The thesis option is appropriate for those students wishing to research current issues in the discipline or eventually pursue a doctoral program in TESOL or related language field. By the end of the second semester, students wishing to pursue the thesis option should speak with the program director to seek approval and a recommendation for a thesis committee chairperson.

Our courses are focused on theory into practice and, therefore, often have a service-learning, practical, or applied project as an integral part of the curriculum. The TSL 6640 Research in Second Language is required and should be taken in the first semester of study. A final cumulative course, TSL 6642 Issues in Second Language Acquisition, is also required. TSL 5325 will help students prepare for their comprehensive exam.

All students must take a comprehensive written examination covering the core TSL courses. This examination is normally taken in the last semester of graduate work and will be reviewed by members of the TESOL Graduate Committee. A student may take the comprehensive examination only twice, and a second examination will not be given in the same semester in which the first attempt occurred.

Required Courses—24 Credit Hours

Eight required core courses provide a strong foundation in the content of the discipline.

  • TSL 5525 ESOL Cultural Diversity (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 6142 Critical Approaches to ESOL (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 6250 Applied Linguistics in ESOL (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 6350 Grammar for ESOL Teachers (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 6440 Problems in Evaluation in ESOL (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 6642 Issues in Second Language Acquisition (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 6640 Research in Second Language (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 5345 Methods of ESOL Teaching or TSL 6940 ESOL Practicum (3 credit hours)

Elective Courses—3 Credit Hours

All students must take at least 3 credit hours of electives. Electives provide for three distinct areas of interest: TESOL, linguistics, and multicultural education. Students take their elective credit in one of these areas depending on their interests. 

TESOL
  • TSL 5325 ESOL Strategies (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 5380 Computers and Technology for ESOL (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 5376 Reading and Writing in a Second Language (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 5940 Issues in TEFL (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 6252 Sociolinguistics for ESOL (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 5601 Second Language Vocabulary Learning (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 5907 Directed Independent Study (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 6374 TESOL Listening, Speaking and Pronunciation (3 credit hours)
Linguistics
  • LIN 5137 Linguistics (3 credit hours)
  • LIN 6932 Problems in Linguistics (3 credit hours)
Multicultural Education and Pedagogy
  • EDF 6886 Multicultural Education (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 6940 ESOL Practicum (3 credit hours)
  • EDH 6305 Teaching and Learning in the Community College (3 credit hours)
  • SPA 6474 Assessment of Culturally and Linguistically Populations (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 5085 Teaching Language to Minority Students K-12 (3 credit hours)
  • ENC 5276 Writing/Consulting: Theory and Practice (3 credit hours)
  • ENC 5705 Theory and Practice in Composition (3 credit hours)
Research
  • EDF 6401 Statistics for Educational Data (3 credit hours)

Thesis Option—3 Credit Hours

  • TSL 6971 Thesis (3 credit hours)

Nonthesis Option—9 Credit Hours

Nonthesis students must take an additional 9 credit hours of electives from the list of electives above. 


Timeline for Completion

To facilitate student progress, we offer the core courses at least once each calendar year. Normally, it takes two years for a student to complete the MA TESOL program.

Advising and Mentoring

Advising and mentoring are two very important elements in a graduate student’s career. It is essential that appropriate advising, supervision, and mentoring be provided to students as soon as they enter the program. Thus, each beginning graduate student will be assigned an advisor by the TESOL Program Assistant. The advisor provides guidance on overall academic requirements, program policies, and procedures. Keep in mind that you can also contact the Graduate Coordinator of the TESOL Program with general questions about the program policies and requirements.

ALL new students MUST meet with their assigned advisor prior to the beginning of the first semester.  This meeting can be arranged by e-mailing the advisor.  E-mail addresses are available on the UCF website; email addresses may also be obtained by contacting the TESOL Program Assistant.

Upon admission, it is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with the general policies listed in the Graduate Catalogue. It is also the student’s responsibility to access the graduate catalog detailing the course requirements for the chosen program (for example, MA TESOL, TEFL Certificate, or ESOL Endorsement K-12). It is expected that the student will contact her or his assigned advisor with questions about coursework as soon as possible.

If the student chooses to write a thesis, it is not imperative that the assigned advisor become a thesis advisor as well. The student may select a different thesis mentor for this specific project, depending on the student’s research interests. Thus, it is possible for a graduate student to have two functioning advisors. One is the general advisor who helps the student select appropriate coursework. If the student wishes to work on a thesis or on an independent research project, another mentor/advisor could be selected. It is generally assumed that a faculty member will agree to mentor a student’s project if there is a shared research interest. Additional information regarding writing a thesis in this program can be found in the Thesis Requirement section.

Potential Plan of Study for the MATESOL—based on a two-year degree program.

Year 1 
FallSpringSummer
  • TSL 6250 Applied Linguistics in ESOL (3)
  • TSL 6640 Research in a Second Language (3)
  • TSL 5345 Methods of ESOL Teaching (3) 
  • TSL 6142 Critical Approaches to ESOL (3)
  • TSL 5525 ESOL Cultural Diversity (3)
  • Elective One (Recommended: TSL5940 Issues in TEFL or TSL 5380 Computers and Technology for ESOL) (3)
  • Elective If So Choose
Semester Total: 9 Credit HoursSemester Total: 9 Credit Hours 
Year 2
FallSpringSummer
  • TSL 6350 Grammar for ESOL Teachers (3)
  • TSL 6440 Problems in Evaluation in ESOL (3)
  • TSL 6940 ESOL Practicum (if did not take TSL 5345) OR Elective Two (Recommended: Either TSL 6252 Sociolinguistics or TSL 5376 Read and Write in ESOL) (3)
  • TSL 6642 Issues in SLA (3)
  • A TSL 6940 ESOL Practicum (if did not take TSL 5345 OR as Elective Three)
  • Elective Three (Recommended: TSL 5325) 
  • Elective Four (Recommended TSL 5380 Computers in TESOL)
  • Elective If So Choose
Semester Total: 9 Credit HoursSemester Total: 9 Credit Hours 

Potential Plan of Study for the TEFL Certificate—based on a one-semester program.

FallSpring
  • TSL 6250 Applied Linguistics in ESOL (3)
  • TSL 6350 Grammar for ESOL Teachers (3)
  • TSL 5345 Methods of ESOL Teaching or TSL 6940 ESOL Practicum (3)
  • TSL 6142 Critical Approaches to ESOL (3)
  • TSL 6142 Critical Approaches to ESOL (3)
  • TSL 5940 Issues in TEFL (3)
  • TSL 6250 Applied Linguistics in ESOL (3)
  • TSL 6940 ESOL Practicum (3)
Semester Total: 12 Credit HoursSemester Total: 12 Credit Hours

Potential Plan of Study for the ESOL Endorsement—based on a two-semester program.

FallSpring
  • TSL 6250 Applied Linguistics in ESOL (3)
  • TSL 6440 Problems in Evaluation in ESOL (3)
  • TSL 5345 Methods of ESOL Teaching (3)
  • TSL 6142 Critical Approaches to ESOL (3)
  • TSL 5525 ESOL Cultural Diversity or EDF 6886 Multicultural Education (3)
Semester Total: 9 Credit HoursSemester Total: 6 Credit Hours

 

Course Schedule





Examination Requirements

All students must take a comprehensive written examination covering the core TSL courses. Specifically, this means that you should have taken or be taking the following:

  • Applied Linguistics,
  • Critical Approaches
  • Methods OR Practicum
  • Problems in Evaluation
  • Issues in Second Language Acquisition
  • Pedagogical Grammar

The more courses you have completed, the better your chances of success on the exam.  Consult your advisor if you are not sure that you are ready.

For full-time and part-time students, the exam normally will be taken in their second year of graduate work.

The exam will be reviewed and graded by members of the TESOL Graduate Committee. Please note that a student may take the comprehensive examination only twice. Contact the Program Assistant for up-to-date information regarding the Comprehensive Exam.

Thesis Requirements

Thesis Option and Thesis Committee

The majority of students in the program do not select this option. As a rule, we encourage students to choose the thesis option only if they have an established research agenda.

A master’s student’s thesis committee must consist of at least three members and be approved by the College’s Associate Dean of Graduate Studies as the very first step. Of the three members, two of these must be qualified regular faculty members in your program, one of whom must serve as the chair of the committee.

Adjuncts, visiting faculty, courtesy appointments or qualified individuals from outside the university may serve as the third member or co-chair of the committee, but that person may not serve as the chair. (If there are co-chairs, one must satisfy faculty qualifications for serving as a chair of a dissertation advisory committee. The other co-chair must satisfy the minimum requirements for serving as a member of a dissertation advisory committee.) Qualifications of additional members must be equivalent to that expected of UCF faculty members. UCF faculty members must form the majority of any given committee.

For more details about the Thesis Committee, please refer to the UCF Graduate Catalogue: www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu > Policies > Master’s Program Policies > Thesis Requirements > Thesis Advisory Committee Composition. 

The thesis option contains fewer credits (30) than the nonthesis option (36). Many students mistakenly believe that the thesis option is more suitable because of the smaller number of credits required. Even though the thesis consists of 3 credits, it is much more work than just 3 credits. If a student does not have a compelling reason for doing the thesis option, then the nonthesis option is the only correct route.

University Thesis Requirements

The College of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation page contains information on the university’s requirements for thesis formatting, format review, defenses, final submission, and more. A step-by-step completion guide is also available at Completing Your Thesis or Dissertation.

All university deadlines are listed in the Academic Calendar. Your program or college may have other earlier deadlines; please check with your program and college staff for additional deadlines.

The following requirements must be met by thesis students in their final term:

  • Submit a properly formatted file for initial format review by the format review deadline
  • Submit the Thesis and Dissertation Release Option form well before the defense
  • Defend by the defense deadline
  • Receive format approval (if not granted upon initial review)
  • Submit signed approval form by final submission deadline
  • Submit final thesis document by final submission deadline

Students must format their thesis according to the standards outlined at Formatting the ETD. Formatting questions or issues can be submitted to the Format Help page in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. Format reviews and final submission must be completed in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. The Thesis Approval Form is also available in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site.

The College of Graduate Studies offers several thesis and dissertation Workshops each term. Students are highly encouraged to attend these workshops early in the thesis process to fully understand the above policies and procedures.

The College of Graduate Studies thesis and dissertation office is best reached by email at editor@ucf.edu.  

Thesis Enrollment

Prior to enrollment into TSL 6971 Thesis, your thesis committee must be reviewed and approved by the College of Arts and Humanities Assistant Dean of Graduate Studies. This form can be found online at www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=786.

For master's students pursuing a thesis option, full-time enrollment is defined as 3 hours per semester (including summers, without skipping a semester) of thesis course work (TSL 6971), after completion of all course work and until graduation. Students who wish to enroll in part-time hours should consult their adviser.

Graduate Research

Because the MA degree is often terminal for teachers of English as a second or foreign language, students may not have to conduct empirical research independently. However, all graduate coursework involves some degree of research. For example, your courses may require that you conduct library research on a specific issue in TESOL/Applied Linguistics.  UCF now offers a PhD in Education with a Specialty in TESOL.  Our department is collaborating with the Education Department to offer this degree.  Your classes in the MATESOL program are pre-requisites for this degree and some courses are part of this degree.  If your plan is to continue on to the PhD program, you should consult with your Advisor and plan for your future research.

Please keep in mind that, for all of your courses, you are expected to present original work. Plagiarism comes in many forms, and it will not be tolerated. To avoid plagiarism, we recommend that you become familiar with the latest edition of the APA Style Manual as soon as possible upon admission to the program. If you do not wish to purchase the manual, you can locate copies of it at the UCF library, or you can find it online by using any of the popular web search engines. Please adhere to this particular manual in all your written work. One of the primary objectives of TSL 6640 Research in Second Language is to be able to use APA style in writing research.

You should also consult the University of Central Florida’s Golden Rule Student Handbook: The Complete Rules of Conduct book for more details on policies concerning plagiarism at www.goldenrule.sdes.ucf.edu

Human Subjects

If students choose to conduct research that involves human subjects (for example, surveys, interviews, classroom observations, etc.), they must gain Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval prior to beginning the study. For access to the IRB submission form and sample consent forms, please visit the Office of Research website: www.research.ucf.edu > Compliance > UCF IRB Webpage > UCF-IRB Principal Investigator’s Manual

Ethics in Research

Researchers in every discipline have a responsibility for ethical awareness as the status of the profession rests with each individual researcher. It is important to be honest and ethical in conducting research as well as in taking classes. The ethical collection and use of information includes, but is by no means limited to, the following: confidentiality, accuracy, relevance, self-responsibility, honesty, and awareness of conflict of interest.

Patent and Invention Policy

UCF has three fundamental responsibilities with regard to graduate student research. They are to (1) support an academic environment that stimulates the spirit of inquiry, (2) develop the intellectual property stemming from research, and to (3) disseminate the intellectual property to the general public. UCF owns the intellectual property developed using university resources. The graduate student as inventor will, according to this policy, share in the proceeds of the invention.

The full policy is available online from the Graduate Catalog: www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu > Policies > General Policies > Patent & Invention Policy.

Graduation

At the beginning of (or before) the semester of intended completion, the student must file an Intent-to-Graduate form that must be completed and signed by the end of late registration add/drop period for that semester.

Students who submit an Intent-to-Graduate form but who are missing degree requirements (with no indication of completion in process) will be either approved for graduation on a pending status or denied. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that the requirements of their degree have been met. Therefore, students are encouraged to review their SASS audit regularly. The audit can be found online at

my.ucf.edu > Student Self Service > Student Center > Degree Audit. 

Financial Support

Financial support opportunities within the program are extremely competitive. Please consult the Graduate Program Coordinator for further details.

International Students

Several types of employment are available to international students, including on-campus employment. For more information about the types of employment available to international students, and the requirements and restrictions based on visa-type, please see the International Affairs and Global Strategies' website: www.intl.ucf.edu > Current Students > Employment.

Assistantships and Tuition Waivers

For complete information about university assistantships and tuition waivers, please see the UCF Graduate Catalog: www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu > Financial Information

To be employed and to maintain employment in a graduate position, the student must be:

  • In good academic standing
  • Enrolled full time

To be awarded and continue receipt of a tuition waiver, the student must be:

  • In good academic standing
  • Enrolled full time
  • Employed in a graduate position (GTA, GRA, GA) or receiving a University fellowship

Master's students can be offered tuition support for a maximum of nine semesters.

GTA Training Requirements

If the student is hired in the position of Graduate Teaching Associate, Assistant or Grader, there are training requirements that must be met in order for the contract to be processed. Associates must also have completed at least 18 hours of graduate courses in the discipline they will be teaching. The GTA training, offered by UCF’s Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, covers course design, learning theories, ethics, and other topics relevant to preparing GTAs for their responsibilities. These services are offered by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning (FCTL) and more information can be found at the following website: www.fctl.ucf.edu > Events > GTA Programs.

International students who will be hired in GTA positions must be proficient at speaking English. This is determined by successfully passing the SPEAK test with a score of 55 or better. This test (also known as the Oral Proficiency Exam) is administered by the Center for Multicultural and Multilingual Services (CMMS). For more information and to register, visit SPEAK Test  on the College of Graduate Studies Students website.

GTA Performance Assessment

At the completion of each semester the student is employed as a GTA, the student’s performance will be evaluated by the faculty advisor. These assessments will be used to review strengths and weaknesses in the student’s performance in preparation for future employment. 

Graduate Student Associations

Students may wish to become members of professional organizations such as Central Florida TESOL (centralfloridatesol.org), Sunshine State TESOL of Florida SSTESOL (www.sstesol.org) or the larger TESOL organization (www.tesol.org), which is the global association for English educators. Even if students do not present papers, we encourage them to attend these two conferences, especially if they are nearby. There is also a local Central Florida TESOL chapter of the state group.

Central Florida TESOL usually holds its annual meeting in mid-fall.  SSTESOL state meeting is usually in May.  The regional Southeast TESOL (SETESOL), which encompasses 10 states (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida) meets in late fall.  The international TESOL meeting is around spring break week. All of these conferences are applicable to TESOL students; presenting at a professional conference is certainly a good way to develop a resume that will help separate the job candidate from other graduates. Financial support may be available to support travel expenses. Please see the professional Development Travel Opportunities section for additional information.

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is UCF's graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students' personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu. For individual department or graduate program organizations, please see program advisor.

Professional Development

While this is not required for graduation purposes, we strongly encourage MA students to present a poster or a topic of their research at conferences and publish their papers in professional journals. The Graduate Research Forum, organized annually by the UCF College of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Student Association, provides an excellent opportunity for students to share their creative projects with others.

Presenting at a Conference

Presenting at a professional conference is an excellent way to build up your resume. It shows a prospective employer that you are the kind of teacher who is interested in the profession enough to do more than just teach your classes. It helps your resume stand out from the 50+ resumes that the employer probably received for the job that you are applying for.

Here are the most likely TESOL-related conferences you can submit a proposal for and possibly get accepted. Please note that funding is a separate issue.

Sunshine State TESOL: This is our state TESOL conference. It usually takes place in May, and proposals are due in February.  Common sites are St. Pete, Miami, West Palm, and Orlando. centralfloridatesol.org

Central Florida SSTESOL: This is the local central Florida chapter of the Sunshine TESOL group. There are two meetings per year, usually in fall and spring. Proposals are due about a month in advance. sstesol.org

BART: This is the local Tampa/St. Pete chapter of the Sunshine TESOL group. There is usually one meeting per year, in May or June.  Proposals are due about a month in advance. bartesol.org

Southeast TESOL: This is a conference for the 12 southeastern states: Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Virginia. The annual conference takes place in fall and the site rotates among the states. Proposals are usually due in April or May. (When Florida is the location, there is no annual Sunshine State TESOL meeting that year, e.g., 2010.)

International TESOL: This is a worldwide conference held in the US or Canada. More information can be found at www.tesol.org. This conference is held in spring and proposals are due the previous May. Acceptance is very competitive. (2011 is New Orleans; 2012 is Philadelphia; 2013 is Dallas)

Conference Presentation Support

In general, UCF will not offer any funding if you are not presenting.  Attending a conference is a wonderful professional experience, but funding is reserved for presenters.

Graduate students can seek funding from three sources: UCF Student Government, UCF College of Graduate Studies, and Program/Department. It is recommended that you seek funding from these sources in this same order (i.e., SG, COGS, and your program/department).

UCF Student Government

All students pay student activity fees, so graduate students are eligible for funding from Student Government money. These funds are limited to $250 per year, and there are guidelines for registration, hotel rates, distance traveled, etc.  You will need to fill out a Conference Registration & Travel (CRT) Individual Allocation Request, which is available at: ucfsga.com/documents/forms/CRTRequestFormIndividual.pdf.

UCF College of Graduate Studies

The College of Graduate Studies offers a Graduate Presentation Fellowship that provides funding for master's, specialist, and doctoral students to deliver a research paper or comparable creative activity at a profession meeting. Students must be the primary author and presenter. Please see the following website for more information: funding.graduate.ucf.edu/presentation/.

Note that awards are made on a first-come, first-served basis, so students are encouraged to apply early in the travel period.  The amount of money will vary each year depending on budget.

Your Program/Department

Having graduate students present at conferences, especially conferences outside the Orlando area, is excellent publicity for the program and increases the program’s and department’s prestige. It is possible that a program may be able to get some funding from the department’s budget, but this funding is subject to annual budgets, availability for graduate students, and college limitations.

Pathways to Success Workshops

Coordinated by the College of Graduate Studies, the Pathways to Success program offers the following free development opportunities for graduate students including workshops in Academic Integrity, Graduate Grantsmanship, Graduate Teaching, Personal Development, Professional Development, and Research. For more information and how to register, please visit www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/pathways/.  

Instructor Training and Development

The Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning (FCTL) promotes excellence in all levels of teaching at the University of Central Florida. They offer several programs for the professional development of Graduate Teaching Assistants at UCF.

  • GTA Training (mandatory for employment as a GTA)
    This training provides information and resources for students who will be instructors in a two-day workshop. The seminars cover a variety of topics, including course development, learning theories, lecturing, and academic freedom. Those interested in additional training can also attend an optional training session that normally follows the mandatory training.

  • Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program
    This certificate program (12-weeks) consists of group and individualized instruction by Faculty Center staff and experienced UCF professors. Textbooks and materials are provided.

For more information: www.fctl.ucf.edu > Events > GTA Programs or call 407/823-3544.

Graduate Research Forum

  • Graduate Research Forum - Sponsored by the College of Graduate Studies, the Research Forum is an opportunity for students to showcase their research and creative projects and to receive valuable feedback from faculty judges. Awards for best poster and best oral presentation in each category will be given and all participants will receive recognition. For more information, please visit www.graduate.ucf.edu/researchforum.

Graduate Excellence Awards

Each year, the College of Graduate Studies offers graduate students who strive for academic and professional excellence the opportunity to be recognized for their work. The award categories include the following:

Award for Excellence by a Graduate Teaching Assistant – This award is for students who provide teaching support and assistance under the direction of a lead teacher. This award focuses on the extent and quality of the assistance provided by the student to the lead instructor and the students in the class. (Not intended for students who are instructor of record)

Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Teaching – This award is for students who serve as instructors of record and have independent classroom responsibilities. The focus of this award is on the quality of the student’s teaching and the academic contributions of those activities.

Award for the Outstanding Master’s Thesis – It recognizes graduate students for excellence in the master's thesis. The focus of this award is on the quality and contribution of the student's thesis research. Excellence of the master's thesis may be demonstrated by evidence such as, but not limited to: publications in refereed journals, awards and recognitions from professional organizations, and praise from faculty members and other colleagues in the field. The university award will be forwarded to a national-level competition sponsored by the Council of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS) when the thesis discipline corresponds to the annual submission request.

Innovative Thesis or Dissertation Award - The Award recognizes cutting-edge use of technology in theses and dissertations. The focus of this award is on the technical innovation of the student's thesis or dissertation through the application of renderings, photos, data sets, software code and other multimedia objects.

For the nomination process and eligibility criteria, see the College of Graduate Studies website www.graduate.ucf.edu/GradAwards.

Other

For information about the Council of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS) thesis and dissertation awards, see their website: www.csgs.org > Awards.

For grant-proposal writing resources: uwc.cah.ucf.edu.

Job Search

Career Services and Experiential Learning

 career.ucf.edu 

Graduate career development issues are unique and include evaluating academic and nonacademic career choices, discussing graduate school effect on career choices, as well as learning, evaluating, and refining networking and interviewing skills. Whatever your needs, the offices of Career Services and Experiential Learning offer services and resources to aid in the career exploration and job search of Master and Doctoral students in every academic discipline.

Dave’s ESL Café

www.eslcafe.com/jobs

Dave’s is a world-renowned website for ESOL and ESL job hunters. 

Forms

  • College of Graduate Studies Forms n Files
    A listing of forms and files for the College of Graduate Studies.
  • Graduate Petition Form
    When unusual situations arise, petitions for exceptions to policy may be requested by the student. Depending on the type of appeal, the student should contact his/her program adviser to begin the petition process.
  • Traveling Scholar Form
    Required form of graduate students who would like to take advantage of resources available on another campus, but not available at UCF; for example, special course offerings, research opportunities, unique laboratories and library collections.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s work and presenting it as your own. Any ideas, data, text, media or materials taken from another source (either written or verbal) must be fully acknowledged.a) A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without acknowledgment.b) A student must give credit to the originality of others whenever:

  1. Directly quoting another person's actual words, whether oral or written;
  2. Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theories;
  3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others, whether oral or written;
  4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
  5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgment.

When using the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, students must give credit to the original source at the location or place in the document where that source's material is found as well as provide bibliographic information at the end of the document. When students are verbally discussing the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, they must give credit to the original source at the time they speak about that source. In this manner, students must make clear (so there is no doubt) within their written or verbal materials, which parts are gained from other sources, and which are their own original ideas, theories, formulas, graphics, and pictures.The Office of Student Conduct has a set of criteria that determines if students are in violation of plagiarism. This set of criteria may be set to a higher standard in graduate programs. Therefore, a student may not be found in violation of plagiarism by the Office of Student Conduct, but a professor or program requiring higher standards of attribution and citation may find a student in violation of plagiarism and administer program level sanctions. The standard in doctoral programs should be the highest as students earning these degrees are expected to be experts in their fields and producing independent work that contributes knowledge to their discipline.

Example of Material that has been appropriately cited:

Paraphrased Material

Source: Osborne, Richard, ed. How to Grow Annuals. 2nd ed. Menlo Park: Lane, 1974. Print. Page 24: As a recent authority has pointed out, for a dependable long-blooming swatch of soft blue in your garden, ageratum is a fine choice. From early summer until frost, ageratum is continuously covered with clustered heads of fine, silky, fringed flowers in dusty shades of lavender-blue, lavender-pink or white. The popular dwarf varieties grow in mounds six to twelve inches high and twelve inches across; they make fine container plants. Larger types grow up to three feet tall. Ageratum makes an excellent edging.

Use and Adaptation of the Material:

You can depend on ageratum if you want some soft blue in your garden. It blooms through the summer and the flowers, soft, small, and fringed, come in various shades of lavender. The small varieties which grow in mounds are very popular, especially when planted in containers. There are also larger varieties. Ageratum is good as a border plant (Osborne 24).

Explanation:

The writer has done a good job of paraphrasing what could be considered common knowledge (available in a number of sources), but because the structure and progression of detail is someone else’s, the writer has acknowledged the source. This the writer can do at the end of the paragraph since he or she has not used the author’s words.

The above example was provided by Northwestern University.

Northwestern University, Sept. 2016. “Academic Integrity: A Basic Guide.” Accessed 20 September 2017.

For more information about Academic Honesty, Click here.

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