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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2017-2018

Program Info

Last Updated 2010-02-09

Modeling and Simulation PhD



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

The PhD degree consists of at least 72 semester hours of course work, including a minimum of 15 dissertation hours. The core will consist of four required courses and three restricted courses. These core courses and a research seminar will provide an interdisciplinary framework for all students. In addition, students are required to take two of the seven focus area cornerstone courses.

Curriculum

The Modeling and Simulation PhD requires a minimum of 72 credit hours of coursework beyond the bachelor's degree, including a minimum of 15 dissertation hours. 

The M&S PhD program requires 15 credit hours of 5 required core courses. These core courses will provide an interdisciplinary framework for all students. 

The remaining 42 credit hours may consist of additional unrestricted elective courses and research hours. At least 27 hours of the total program must consist of formal coursework, exclusive of independent study.


Students may fulfill the restricted elective requirements through the courses chosen in the restricted core. Such students will meet the total credit hour requirements with additional unrestricted elective courses.

Required Courses—15 Credit Hours

Core—15 Credit Hours

  • IDS 6147 Perspectives on Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 5876 Quantitative Aspects of Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)*
  • IDS 6148 Human Systems Integration for Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours) or EIN 6258 Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours) or EXP 6541 Advanced Human-Cmputer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6145 Simulation Techniques (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6262 Research Design for Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)

*Students that are deemed to have strong mathematical preparation can be waived from the requirement of Quantitative Methods (DIG 5876) and can instead take an additional elective course so long as the total program credit hours are met. This determination will be made by the M&S Graduate Program Office.

Restricted Elective—3 Credit Hours

Students must select an elective course from the Modeling and Simulation Graduate Program. Appropriate courses include those that follow. Others may be added over time with Program Director approval.

  • IDC 5602 Cybersecurity: A Multidisciplinary Approach (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6601 Behavioral Aspects of Cybersecurity (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6700 Interdisciplinary Approach to Data Visualization (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 5142 Modeling and Simulation for Instructional Design (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6146 Modeling and Simulation Systems (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6149 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6916 Simulation Research Methods and Practicum (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6938 Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) Design (3 credit hours) 

Unrestricted Electives—39 Credit Hours

All M&S PhD degree program students must take at least 39 credit hours of unrestrictive elective courses that reflect at least two disciplines that support the student’s area of graduate study.

A student must carefully select a set of courses in order to design an appropriate plan of coursework. The purpose of the courses is to ensure that students have depth in their research area as well as have breadth in the interdisciplinary area of modeling and simulation. The set of courses should also support a student’s area of graduate study and to meet the specific educational needs, goals and objectives of that student.

Unrestricted electives must consist of at least 9 credit hours of formal courses, excluding independent study. The remaining credits may consist of additional coursework, directed research, independent study, and additional dissertation as advised appropriately by faculty adviser and/or program director.

Modeling and Simulation PhD Elective Courses

In addition to successfully completing the core courses for the M&S PhD program, students are required to carefully select electives with the guidance of a Program Director or faculty adviser. Elective choices should be made with the intent to strengthen a research interest and/or area of focus in order to meet the individual student’s educational goals and objectives.

Listed below are suggested courses in various areas of focus or specialization. These course groupings are mere guides, are not exhaustive and are only meant to assist with advising and course selection in order to meet the individual student’s educational goals and objectives. They are not intended to restrict elective choices among focus areas as we strongly encourage Modeling and Simulation students to maintain an interdisciplinary approach to their graduate studies.

If a student identifies another UCF course which may be of value to his/her M&S research area, but is not already identified in a list below, that student may request approval from the Graduate Program Director for the course to be used as an elective in the Graduate Plan of Study. All such requests must be made in advance of enrolling in the course.

Those electives categorized as “General” and “Fundamentals of Modeling and Simulation” would be appropriate for all students regardless of interest area. The remaining categories are grouped by area of interest.

General

  • ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6891 IEMS Research Methods (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 5907 Independent Study (variable)
  • IDS 5917 Directed Research (variable)
  • IDS 6908 Independent Study (variable)
  • IDS 6918 Directed Research (variable)
  • IDS 6946 Internship (variable)
  • IDS 7919 Doctoral Research (variable)
  • PHI 5340 Research Methods in Cognitive Sciences (3 credit hours)
  • PSY 6216C Research Methodology (4 credit hours)
  • STA 5205 Experimental Design (3 credit hours)

Fundamentals of Modeling and Simulation

  • DIG 5876 Quantitative Aspects of Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6217 Statistical Aspects of Digital Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6532 Object-Oriented Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6700 Interdisciplinary Approach to Data Visualization (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6146 Modeling and Simulation Systems (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6147 Perspectives on Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6149 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6950 Modeling and Simulation Capstone Report Planning (1 credit hour)
  • IDS 6145 Simulation Techniques (3 credit hours)

Behavioral Cybersecurity

  • CAP 6133 Advanced Topics in Computer Security and Computer Forensics (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6135 Malware and Software Vulnerability Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • CDA 6530 Performance Models of Computers and Networks (3 credit hours)
  • CJE 6688 Cyber Crime and Criminal Justice (3 credit hours)
  • CNT 5008 Computer Communication Networks Architecture (3 credit hours)
  • CNT 5410L Cyber Operations Lab (3 credit hours)
  • CNT 6519 Wireless Security and Forensics (3 credit hours)
  • COT 5405 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 5876 Quantitative Aspects of Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6785 Computer Network Design (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6883 Software Engineering II (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 5256 Human Factors I (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6506 Human Cognition and Learning (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 5602 Cybersecurity: A Multidisciplinary Approach (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6600 Emerging Cyber Issues (1 credit hour)
  • IDC 6601 Behavioral Aspects of Cybersecurity (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6916 Simulation Research Methods and Practicum (3 credit hours)
  • INR 6365 Seminar on Intelligence (3 credit hours)
  • INR 6366 The Intelligence Community (3 credit hours)
  • PHI 6938 ST: Digital Ethics (3 credit hours)
  • STA 5703 Data Mining Methodology I (3 credit hours)
  • STA 5825 Stochastic Processes and Applied Probability Theory (3 credit hours)

Human Systems

  • CAP 6515 Algorithms in Computational Biology (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6671 Intelligent Systems: Robots, Agents, and Humans (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6676 Knowledge Representation (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6432 Transmedia Story Creation (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6812 Digital Interaction for Informal Learning (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5248C Ergonomics (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5317 Training System Design (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6215 System Safety Engineering and Management (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6258 Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6649C Intelligent Tutoring Training System Design (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6458 Virtual Teaching and the Digital Educator (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6507 Multimedia for Education and Training (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6601 Instructional Simulation Design for Training and Education (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6614 Instructional Game Design for Training and Education (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6646 Learning, Instructional Design, and Cognitive Neuroscience (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 5208 Sensation and Perception (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 5256 Human Factors I (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6255 Human Performance (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6257 Human Factors II (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6258 Human Factors III (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6506 Human Cognition and Learning (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6541 Advanced Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6148 Human Systems Integration for Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6149 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation (3 credit hours)
  • PHI 5225 Philosophy of Language (3 credit hours)
  • PHI 5325 Topics in Philosophy of Mind (3 credit hours)
  • PHI 5327 Topics in Cognitive Sciences (3 credit hours)
  • PHI 5329 Philosophy of Neuroscience (3 credit hours)
  • PSB 5005 Physiological Psychology (3 credit hours)
  • TTE 6270 Intelligent Transportation Systems (3 credit hours) 

Computer Visualization

  • CAP 5725 Computer Graphics I (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6411 Computer Vision Systems (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6412 Advanced Computer Vision (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6676 Knowledge Representation (3 credit hours)
  • CDA 5106 Advanced Computer Architecture (3 credit hours)
  • COT 5405 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6605 Physical Computing (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6647 Science and Technology of Dynamic Media (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6258 Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5173 Linear Systems Theory (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5771C Engineering Applications of Computer Graphics (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5820 Image Processing (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5825 Pattern Recognition (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5874 Expert Systems and Knowledge Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6823 Image Processing II (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6843 Machine Perception (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6700 Interdisciplinary Approach to Data Visualization (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 5117 Mathematical Modeling (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6118 Introduction to Nonlinear Dynamics (3 credit hours)
  • MAT 5712 Scientific Computing (3 credit hours)

Quantitative Methods for Simulation, Modeling and Analysis

  • CAP 5512 Evolutionary Computation (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6515 Algorithms in Computational Biology (3 credit hours)
  • CDA 6530 Performance Models of Computers and Networks (3 credit hours)
  • COT 5405 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 5876 Quantitative Aspects of Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5173 Linear Systems Theory (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6878 Modeling and Artificial Intelligence (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6528 Simulation Based Life Cycle Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5306 Operations Research (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6217 Statistical Aspects of Digital Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6700 Interdisciplinary Approach to Data Visualization (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 5117 Mathematical Modeling (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6111 Mathematical Statistics (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6118 Introduction to Nonlinear Dynamics (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6207 Optimization Theory (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6385 Applied Numerical Mathematics (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6407 Applied Mathematics I (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6408 Applied Mathematics II (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6445 Approximation Techniques (3 credit hours)
  • MAT 5712 Scientific Computing (3 credit hours)
  • STA 5703 Data Mining Methodology I (3 credit hours)
  • STA 5825 Stochastic Processes and Applied Probability Theory (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6236 Regression Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6246 Linear Models (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6326 Theoretical Statistics I (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6327 Theoretical Statistics II (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6329 Statistical Applications of Matrix Algebra (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6704 Data Mining Methodology II (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6714 Data Preparation (3 credit hours)

Simulation in Healthcare

  • CAP 6515 Algorithms in Computational Biology (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6671 Intelligent Systems: Robots, Agents, and Humans (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6676 Knowledge Representation (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6647 Science and Technology of Dynamic Media (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6812 Digital Interaction for Informal Learning (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5820 Image Processing (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6823 Image Processing II (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6645 Real-Time Simulation Agents (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • HUM 5802 Applied Contemporary Humanities (3 credit hours)
  • NGR 6717 Introduction to Healthcare Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • NGR 6771L Healthcare Simulation Practicum (3 credit hours)
  • NGR 6794 Organizational Leadership and Operations in Healthcare Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • NGR 6978 Healthcare Simulation Capstone Project (3 credit hours)
  • PHI 5329 Philosophy of Neuroscience (3 credit hours)
  • PSB 5005 Physiological Psychology (3 credit hours)
  • SPA 6417 Cognitive/Communicative Disorders (3 credit hours)
  • SPA 6451 Theory and Clinical Aspects Cognitive-Comm Disorders in Traumatic Brain Injury (3 credit hours)

Interactive Simulation and Intelligent Systems

  • CAP 5512 Evolutionary Computation (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 5610 Machine Learning (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 5636 Advanced Artificial Intelligence (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6671 Intelligent Systems: Robots, Agents, and Humans (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6676 Knowledge Representation (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6812 Digital Interaction for Informal Learning (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5771C Engineering Applications of Computer Graphics (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5874 Expert Systems and Knowledge Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6878 Modeling and Artificial Intelligence (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5251 Usability Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5255C Interactive Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6258 Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6645 Real-Time Simulation Agents (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6647 Intelligent Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6649C Intelligent Tutoring Training System Design (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6613 Instructional System Design (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6149 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation (3 credit hours)

Simulation Infrastructure

  • CAP 6671 Intelligent Systems: Robots, Agents, and Humans (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6676 Knowledge Representation (3 credit hours)
  • CDA 5106 Advanced Computer Architecture (3 credit hours)
  • CDA 6107 Parallel Computer Architecture (3 credit hours)
  • CDA 6530 Performance Models of Computers and Networks (3 credit hours)
  • CNT 5008 Computer Communication Networks Architecture (3 credit hours)
  • COT 5405 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6605 Physical Computing (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5173 Linear Systems Theory (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5771C Engineering Applications of Computer Graphics (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6762 Performance Analysis of Computer and Communication Systems (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6785 Computer Network Design (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6878 Modeling and Artificial Intelligence (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6883 Software Engineering II (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6885 Software Engineering Quality Assurance Methods (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6551 Systems Architecting (3 credit hours)
  • MAT 5712 Scientific Computing (3 credit hours)

Simulation Management

  • EIN 5108 The Environment of Technical Organizations (3 credit hours) 
  • EIN 5117 Management Information Systems I (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5140 Project Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5356 Cost Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6182 Engineering Management (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6215 System Safety Engineering and Management (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6339 Operations Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6357 Advanced Engineering Economic Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6528 Simulation Based Life Cycle Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5227 Total Quality Improvement (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6224 Quality Management (3 credit hours) 
  • ESI 6358 Decision Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6551 Systems Architecting (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6700 Interdisciplinary Approach to Data Visualization (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6149 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation (3 credit hours)

Waived Credits

The doctoral program will allow up to 30 credit hours to be waived from an earned master’s degree.

Dissertation—15 Credit Hours Minimum

  • XXX 7980 Dissertation Research (15 credit hours minimum)

Qualifying Examination

The M&S Qualifying Examination (QE) consists of a written paper and an oral presentation to an Evaluation Committee.  Detailed information regarding the M&S QE is provided at this link: http://www.ist.ucf.edu/grad/Forms/phd-milestones.pdf. 

Dissertation Adviser and Dissertation Advisory Committee

Students have the responsibility to select a Dissertation Adviser from a list of faculty authorized to direct dissertations. The student and the Dissertation Adviser, then, must identify and select the other members of the student’s Dissertation Advisory Committee. The Dissertation Advisory Committee consists of a minimum of four members.

All committee members should hold a doctoral or terminal degree and be in fields related to the dissertation topic, and at least three members must be regular Modeling and Simulation graduate faculty (one to serve as chair) from at least two UCF colleges. At least one member of the committee must have served as a committee member on a prior M&S Thesis or Dissertation Advisory Committee. In some cases, with approval from the Program Director, a committee member may serve as co-chair of the committee. The M&S Program Director can assist students with selection of their adviser as well as with committee formation, additions, and deletions. The UCF College of Graduate Studies has the right to review appointments to advisory committees, place a representative on any advisory committee, or appoint a co-adviser. 

Candidacy Examination

The Candidacy Examination evaluates the student’s preparation to perform independent research to undertake the research in the student’s dissertation topic. A student may sit for the Candidacy Examination upon: 

  1. passing the Qualifying Examination; 
  2. completing all conditions placed as a result thereof; and 
  3. completing all but 6 credit hours or less of the courses prescribed in the student’s Graduate Plan of Study.

The Candidacy Examination includes all of the following:

The Dissertation Research Proposal

The research proposal is a written exposition of a academic or scientific topic and specific research question(s)/hypothesis(es) that is/are developed by the student; the research proposal identifies the chosen area(s) of research and offers convincing support of the need for the research investigation being proposed. Specifically, the research proposal includes at least the following components: 

  • Motivation of the research investigation. Background and the motivation for the pursuit of the dissertation topic should be clearly and thoroughly explained including the historical and modern view of the topic and the rationale and need for the proposed research. The specific research questions(s)/hypothesis(es) that is/are being addressed and the research objectives must be described;
  • Literature review on the topic of the dissertation. A good literature review expands upon the reasons behind selecting the research question(s)/hypothesis(es). The review is an extensive summary and synopsis of the area(s) of research, and it provides a critical and in-depth evaluation of previous related research on the topic. It is an abstracting and synthesis of previous research, and the review explains how it integrates into the proposed research investigation. All sides of an argument must be clearly explained, to avoid bias, and areas of agreement and disagreement should be highlighted; and
  • A detailed proposed methodology for conducting the research. This ethodology must be consistent with the requirements of the field. It is customary to include any preliminary modeling and results in this discussion to show the potential of strengths and weaknesses of the methodology. 
An oral defense of the Dissertation Research Proposal

This defense includes a formal, oral presentation of the written Dissertation Research Proposal before the Dissertation Advisory Committee.

A refereed published or accepted for publication manuscript

Students preparing for the Candidacy Examination should have at least one refereed published or accepted for publication manuscript directly related to the dissertation research, and the student must be a significant contributor to the work and the paper. If the refereed manuscript is not published, it should be fully accepted, and not conditionally accepted. This manuscript may be a journal or proceedings publication from a reputable conference.

All members vote on acceptance or rejection of the Dissertation Research Proposal and the Dissertation Proposal must be approved with at most one dissenting member of the advisory committee. A student is normally given one opportunity to pass the oral defense of the Dissertation Research Proposal, but the M&S Program Director, upon the recommendation of the student’s Dissertation Advisory Committee, may approve at most a second attempt. 

Admission to Candidacy

In summary, the following are required for a student to be admitted to candidacy and subsequently enroll in dissertation hours:

  • Completion of all course work, except for dissertation hours; 
  • The Dissertation Advisory Committee is formed, consisting of approved graduate faculty and graduate faculty scholars; 
  • Submission of an approved Graduate Plan of Study;
  • Successful completion of the Candidacy Examination (see Candidacy Examination section above for details).

Dissertation Defense

The Dissertation Defense is a formal, oral examination of the written dissertation before the Dissertation Advisory Committee. All members vote either “Pass” or “Fail” of the written dissertation, and the dissertation and Dissertation Defense must be approved with at most one dissenting member of the advisory committee. A student is normally given one opportunity to pass the oral defense of the dissertation, but the M&S Program Director, upon the recommendation of the student’s Dissertation Advisory Committee, may approve at most a second attempt.

Plan of Study

After admission to the PhD program, students should file a Graduate Plan of Study (GPS) with the Modeling and Simulation Graduate Program Office.

The purpose of the GPS is to design an appropriate program of coursework to support a student’s area of graduate study and to meet the specific educational needs, goals and objectives of that student. The coursework must be selected to form a unified, cohesive plan of study. All graduate credit in a doctoral program must be at 5000 level or higher, and at least one-half of the credit hours used to meet program requirements must be in 6000-level or 7000-level courses.

The GPS should be developed under the supervision of the Dissertation Adviser(s) and members of the Dissertation Advisory Committee, although initially it may be constructed under the supervision of the M&S Graduate Program Office.

Changes in the Graduate Plan of Study can be made (due to course offering deletions, schedule conflicts, etc.) and with the approval of the M&S Graduate Program Office.

Programs of Study for students seeking a doctoral degree should be on file with the College of Graduate Studies by the end of the third major term of enrollment (based on full-time enrollment) and must be on file prior to the change to candidacy status.

Equipment Fee

Full-time students in the Modeling and Simulation PhD program pay a $27 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled. Part-time students pay a $13.50 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled.


Timeline for Completion

  • Core Coursework and Electives (two years to complete)
  • Qualifying Exams
  • Candidacy Exam (to formally propose dissertation topic)
  • Research (about two years)
  • Dissertation Writing (about a year)
  • Dissertation Defense

Examination Requirements

Qualifying Examination

A written test is required covering content of the core courses. Students in the Modeling and Simulation program should also demonstrate consistent, strong performance in their required core courses, restricted core courses, and focus area corner stone courses apart from the performance in the written test. Specifically, students must receive a grade of B (3.0 out of 4.0) or better in each required core, restricted core, and focus area corner stone course that appear on their approved plan of study. Additionally, students must earn a combined GPA of 3.5 (out of 4.0) in these required cores, restricted core and focus area cornerstone courses. The qualifying exam is scheduled by the program director or coordinator periodically based on the number of students intending to take the exam during a particular semester.

Candidacy Examination

The Candidacy Examination evaluates the student’s preparation to undertake the research in the student’s dissertation topic. A student may sit for the Candidacy Examination upon: (1) Passing the Qualifying Examination; (2) Completing all conditions placed as a result thereof; and (3) Completing all but six (6) credits or less of the courses prescribed in the plan of study.

The Candidacy Examination is based on the following:

  • The Candidacy Proposal developed by the student to identify the chosen area of research.
  • Literature Review on the topic of the dissertation.
  • An Oral Defense of the candidacy proposal to the dissertation committee.

The candidacy exam is taken after the student completes all the course work or during the last semester of the course work. It usually takes the form of the draft of the first three chapters of the dissertation. If the student does not pass the exam on the first attempt he is allowed to take the exam for a second time.

Admission to Candidacy

The following are required to be admitted to candidacy and enroll in dissertation hours:

  • Completion of all course work, except for dissertation hours.
  • Successful completion of the candidacy examination.
  • Successful defense of the written dissertation proposal.
  • The dissertation advisory committee is formed, consisting of approved graduate faculty and graduate faculty scholars.
  • Submittal of an approved plan of study.

Post-Candidacy Enrollment

Prior to enrollment into IDS 7980 Dissertation Research, the student must have passed candidacy and the dissertation committee must be reviewed and approved by the Dean of the appropriate college. Additionally, the College of Graduate Studies must receive candidacy documents prior to the first day of classes for the term in order to enroll in dissertation hours for that term.

Doctoral students engaging in dissertation research must be continuously enrolled in at least three hours of IDS 7980 every semester, including summers, until they successfully defend and submit their dissertation to the University Thesis Editor. The three hours of dissertation enrollment each semester reflects the expenditure of university resources, particularly if more than the minimum number of hours is required for completion of the dissertation. 

Dissertation Requirements

The following is from the UCF Graduate Catalog Dissertation Requirements section:

The dissertation consists of an original and substantial research study designed, conducted, and reported by the student with the guidance of the Dissertation Committee. The written dissertation must include a common theme with an introduction and literature review, details of the study, and results and conclusions prepared in accordance with program and university requirements. The dissertation is expected to represent a significant contribution to the discipline. Since this work must be original, it is very important that care is taken in properly citing ideas and quotations of others. Failure to do so is academic dishonesty and subject to termination from the program without receiving the degree. An oral defense of the dissertation is required.

University Dissertation Requirements

The College of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation page contains information on the university’s requirements for dissertation formatting, format review, defenses, final submission, and more. A step-by-step completion guide is also available at Completing Your Thesis or Dissertation.

All university deadlines are listed in the Academic Calendar. Your program or college may have other earlier deadlines; please check with your program and college staff for additional deadlines.

The following requirements must be met by dissertation students in their final term:

  • Submit a properly formatted file for initial format review by the format review deadline
  • Submit the Thesis and Dissertation Release Option form well before the defense
  • Defend by the defense deadline
  • Receive format approval (if not granted upon initial review)
  • Submit signed approval form by final submission deadline
  • Submit final dissertation document by final submission deadline

Students must format their dissertation according to the standards outlined at Formatting the ETD. Formatting questions or issues can be submitted to the Format Help page in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. Format reviews and final submission must be completed in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. The Dissertation Approval Form is also available in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site.

The College of Graduate Studies offers several thesis and dissertation Workshops each term. Students are highly encouraged to attend these workshops early in the dissertation process to fully understand the above policies and procedures.

The College of Graduate Studies thesis and dissertation office is best reached by email at editor@ucf.edu.

Dissertation Committee

A doctoral student’s dissertation committee must consist of at least four members. Of the four members, three of these must be qualified regular faculty members of the M&S program, one of whom must serve as the chair of the committee. The fourth member must be from either outside the program or outside the university. A fifth member on the committee is allowed and can come from outside the modeling and simulation program. The committee must include at least one member each from the College of Engineering and College of Arts and Humanities.

Only one adjunct or visiting faculty member may serve as a member of a dissertation committee. An adjunct or visiting faculty may not serve as the chair, but may serve as a co-chair. One of the co-chairs must satisfy faculty qualifications for serving as a chair of a dissertation advisory committee. The other co-chair must satisfy the minimum requirements for serving as a member of a dissertation advisory committee. Qualifications of additional members must be equivalent to that expected of UCF faculty members. UCF faculty members must form the majority of any given committee. More information on the formation of a Dissertation committee can be found at: www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu/content/policies.aspx?id=5696#Dissertation Requirements

Graduate Research

Research is required in most courses such as the capstone course. Research leading to publication is strongly encouraged for master’s students and clearly required for the doctoral students. Modeling and simulation is a multi-disciplinary program that draws its resources for laboratory space from throughout the university. Information on conducting research is covered in the core courses, the research practicum class and the various elective courses. There are numerous associations and societies that focus on research in modeling and simulation. Some of them include Society for computer simulation, Society for applied learning technology, Society for medical simulation, Human factors and ergonomic society and Military operations and research society. In cases of research dishonesty such as plagiarism, each case is referred to the academic advisory committee for appropriate action. Advising on professional development is an intricate part of the advising process. The program encourages participation in internship programs. Most of the courses bring in outside speakers from the industry.

Human Subjects 

If the student chooses to conduct research that involves human subjects (i.e. surveys, interviews, etc.), he or she must gain Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval prior to beginning the study. For access to the IRB submission form and sample consent forms, please visit the Office of Research website: www.research.ucf.edu > Compliance > UCF IRB Webpage > UCF-IRB Principal Investigator’s Manual.

Animal Subjects 

If the student chooses to conduct research that involves animal subjects, he or she must gain Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approval prior to beginning the study. For access to the IACUC submission forms, please visit the Office or Research website: www.research.ucf.edu > Compliance > UCF IACUC Webpage > Animal Use Approval Form 

If you have questions regarding human or animal subjects, please contact Ms. Barbara Ward, IRB Coordinator, at 407-823-2901.

Ethics in Research

Researchers in every discipline have a responsibility for ethical awareness as the status of the profession rests with each individual researcher. It is important to be honest and ethical in conducting research as well as in taking classes. The ethical collection and use of information includes, but is by no means limited to, the following: confidentiality, accuracy, relevance, self-responsibility, honesty, and awareness of conflict of interest. The University of Arizona’s Code of Research Ethics provides our students with guidelines for responsible practice in research. This code of ethics can be found here: http://fp.arizona.edu/senate/ethicode.htm.

Patent and Invention Policy

UCF has three fundamental responsibilities with regard to graduate student research. They are to (1) support an academic environment that stimulates the spirit of inquiry, (2) develop the intellectual property stemming from research, and to (3) disseminate the intellectual property to the general public. UCF owns the intellectual property developed using university resources. The graduate student as inventor will according to this policy share in the proceeds of the invention.

The full Patent and Invention policy is available online from the Graduate Catalog.

Facilities

There is a lot of laboratory space available at the University, Colleges and the Institute for Simulation and Training for conducting research in various areas. Research facilities are available at the following key centers:

  • Institute for Simulation and Training
  • Center for Advanced Transportation Systems Simulation
  • Center for Distributed Learning
  • Team Performance Laboratory
  • Center for Research and Education in Optics and Lasers
  • National Center for Forensic Science
  • Florida Solar Energy Center
  • Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center 

Financial Support

Generally full-time doctoral students receive a support package that includes assistantship and tuition remission based on the availability of funding. A substantial portion of the master’s students get financial assistance based on the research projects available. The funding for the support comes from fellowship opportunities, internship opportunities, research contracts and grants. Research opportunities come from both within and outside the university. Fellowship opportunities are available from within and outside the university. The outside fellowship opportunities include Link fellowships, AT&T fellowships and ITSEC fellowships. Generally, financial support opportunities are more available for students entering the fall semester. In order to process tuition remission for applicable students they must register for the classes well before the start of the semester to enable tuition remission processing.

International Students

Several types of employment are available to international students, including on-campus employment. For more information about the types of employment available to international students, and the requirements and restrictions based in visa-type, please see the International Services Center’s website.

Assistantships

For complete information about university assistantship, tuition remission, and health insurance, please see the Funding for Graduate School section in the Graduate Students website. 

To be appointed and to maintain a graduate assistantship, the student must be:

  • In good academic standing
  • Enrolled full time

To be awarded and continue receipt of tuition remission, the student must be:

  • In good academic standing
  • Enrolled full time
  • Employed on a graduate status (GRA, GTA) or receive a University fellowship

Doctoral students can be offered tuition support for a maximum of twelve semesters (for doctoral student beyond the master’s degree) or twenty-one semesters (for doctoral students without a master’s degree).  

GTA Training Requirements

If the student is hired in the position of Graduate Teaching Associate, Assistant or Grader, there are training requirements that must be met in order for the assistantship agreement to be processed. For more information, see Graduate Teachingon the College of Graduate Studies Students website.

International students who will be hired in GTA positions must be proficient at speaking English. This is determined by successfully passing the SPEAK test.

Support for Conference Presentations

The College of Graduate Studies offers a Graduate Presentation Fellowship that provides funding for master's, specialist, and doctoral students to deliver a research paper or comparable creative activity at a professional meeting. Students must be the primary author and presenter. More information can be found at funding.graduate.ucf.edu/presentation/.

The Student Government Association offers graduate students travel funding to pay transportation expenses for graduate students who are delivering a research paper or comparable creative activity at a professional meeting. Contact the Student Government Association at 407-823-5648 for more information.

Graduate Student Associations

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is UCF's graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students' personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu. For individual department or graduate program organizations, please see program advisor.

Professional Development

Advising on professional development is an intricate part of the advising process. The program encourages participation in internship programs. Most of the courses bring in outside speakers from the industry. There are numerous associations and societies that focus on research in modeling and simulation. Some of them include Society for Computer Simulation, Society for Applied Learning Technology, Society for Medical Simulation, Human Factors and Ergonomic Society and Military Operations and Research Society. Master’s students are strongly encouraged to publish their research work and the doctoral students are expected to have successful publications of their research works in first tier journals.

Instructor Training and Development

The Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning (FCTL) promotes excellence in all levels of teaching at the University of Central Florida. To that end, they offer several programs for the professional development of Graduate Teaching Assistants at UCF.

GTA Training

This training provides information and resources for students who will be instructors in a two-day workshop. The seminars cover a variety of topics, including course development, learning theories, lecturing, and academic freedom. Those interested in additional training can also attend an optional training session that normally follows the mandatory training.

Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program

This  program (12-weeks for domestic students, 16-weeks for international students) consists of group and individualized instruction by Faculty Center staff and experienced UCF professors. Textbooks and materials are provided, and a stipend is offered to current UCF students who complete the certificate. International students are provided the same training as well as information regarding language immersion and tricks and cultural awareness as a way of knowing what to expect from American students.

For more information www.fctl.ucf.edu > Events > Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program or call 407-823-3544.

Pathways to Success Workshops

Coordinated by the College of Graduate Studies, the Pathways to Success program offers free development opportunities for graduate students including workshops in Academic Integrity, Graduate Grantsmanship, Graduate Teaching, Personal Development, Professional Development, and Research. For more information and how to register, please visit www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/pathways/.  

Graduate Research Forum

Sponsored by the College of Graduate Studies, the Graduate Research Forum is an opportunity for students to showcase their research and creative projects and to receive valuable feedback from faculty judges. Awards for best poster and best oral presentation in each category will be given and all participants will receive recognition.

Graduate Excellence Awards

Each year, the College of Graduate Studies offers graduate students who strive for academic and professional excellence the opportunity to be recognized for their work. The award categories include the following:  

Award for Excellence by a Graduate Teaching Assistant – This award is for students who provide teaching support and assistance under the direction of a lead teacher. This award focuses on the extent and quality of the assistance provided by the student to the lead instructor and the students in the class. (Not intended for students who are instructor of record)

Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Teaching – This award is for students who serve as instructors of record and have independent classroom responsibilities. The focus of this award is on the quality of the student’s teaching and the academic contributions of those activities.

Award for the Outstanding Dissertation – It recognizes doctoral students for excellence in the dissertation. The focus of this award is on the quality and contribution of the student's dissertation. Excellence of the dissertation may be demonstrated by evidence such as, but not limited to: publications in refereed journals, awards and recognitions from professional organizations, and praise from faculty members and other colleagues in the field.

For the nomination process and eligibility criteria, see www.graduate.ucf.edu/GradAwards.

Other

For information about the Council of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS) thesis and dissertation awards, see their website: www.csgs.org > Awards.

For grant-proposal writing resources: uwc.ucf.edu/gradwriting.php. > Writing for Graduate School.

The Institute for Simulation and Training (IST) offers the M&S Colloquium Series, Medin Seminar Series and Lunch 'n' Learn Series.  For information and a listing of coming events visit the Lectures webpage on the IST website.

Job Search

UCF’s Career Services department offers a wide range of programs and services designed to assist graduate students. These services include evaluation and exploration of career goals, preparation for the job search and job search resources. To learn more, visit their website at www.career.ucf.edu.

For specific services or resources provided by the academic program, please contact the graduate program director or academic advisor.

Please contact the IST personnel office or see UCF Human Resources for more information regarding employment opportunities at IST and the university.

Forms

  • College of Graduate Studies Forms
    This web link provides a listing of forms and files for the College of Graduate Studies.
  • Graduate Petition Form
    When unusual situations arise, petitions for exceptions to policy may be requested by the student.Depending on the type of appeal, the student should contact his/her program adviser to begin the petition process.
  • Traveling Scholar Form
    If a student would like to take advantage of special resources available on another campus but not available on the home campus; for example, special course offerings, research opportunities, unique laboratories and library collections, this form must be completed and approved.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s work and presenting it as your own. Any ideas, data, text, media or materials taken from another source (either written or verbal) must be fully acknowledged.a) A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without acknowledgment.b) A student must give credit to the originality of others whenever:

  1. Directly quoting another person's actual words, whether oral or written;
  2. Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theories;
  3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others, whether oral or written;
  4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
  5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgment.

When using the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, students must give credit to the original source at the location or place in the document where that source's material is found as well as provide bibliographic information at the end of the document. When students are verbally discussing the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, they must give credit to the original source at the time they speak about that source. In this manner, students must make clear (so there is no doubt) within their written or verbal materials, which parts are gained from other sources, and which are their own original ideas, theories, formulas, graphics, and pictures.The Office of Student Conduct has a set of criteria that determines if students are in violation of plagiarism. This set of criteria may be set to a higher standard in graduate programs. Therefore, a student may not be found in violation of plagiarism by the Office of Student Conduct, but a professor or program requiring higher standards of attribution and citation may find a student in violation of plagiarism and administer program level sanctions. The standard in doctoral programs should be the highest as students earning these degrees are expected to be experts in their fields and producing independent work that contributes knowledge to their discipline.

Example of Material that has been appropriately cited:

Paraphrased Material

Source: Osborne, Richard, ed. How to Grow Annuals. 2nd ed. Menlo Park: Lane, 1974. Print. Page 24: As a recent authority has pointed out, for a dependable long-blooming swatch of soft blue in your garden, ageratum is a fine choice. From early summer until frost, ageratum is continuously covered with clustered heads of fine, silky, fringed flowers in dusty shades of lavender-blue, lavender-pink or white. The popular dwarf varieties grow in mounds six to twelve inches high and twelve inches across; they make fine container plants. Larger types grow up to three feet tall. Ageratum makes an excellent edging.

Use and Adaptation of the Material:

You can depend on ageratum if you want some soft blue in your garden. It blooms through the summer and the flowers, soft, small, and fringed, come in various shades of lavender. The small varieties which grow in mounds are very popular, especially when planted in containers. There are also larger varieties. Ageratum is good as a border plant (Osborne 24).

Explanation:

The writer has done a good job of paraphrasing what could be considered common knowledge (available in a number of sources), but because the structure and progression of detail is someone else’s, the writer has acknowledged the source. This the writer can do at the end of the paragraph since he or she has not used the author’s words.

The above example was provided by Northwestern University.

Northwestern University, Sept. 2016. “Academic Integrity: A Basic Guide.” Accessed 20 September 2017.

For more information about Academic Honesty, Click here.

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