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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2017-2018

Program Info

Last Updated 2011-05-26

Modeling and Simulation MS



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

The MS in Modeling and Simulation program requires a minimum of 30 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree, and offers thesis and non-thesis options. Both options require 9 credit hours of required core courses, and 6 credit hours of cornerstone courses in one or two of seven specialization areas of study. Students in the thesis option must take 9 credit hours of electives and 6 thesis credit hours, while students in the non-thesis option must take 15 credit hours of electives. The elective courses are contingent with the focus areas chosen.

Curriculum

The Modeling and Simulation Master of Science program requires a minimum of 30 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree.

The M&S MS program offers a thesis option and a nonthesis option. Each option requires 15 credit hours of required core courses.

  • Students who select the thesis option must take 9 credit hours of unrestricted electives and 6 thesis credit hours.
  • Students who select the nonthesis option must take 3 credit hours of restricted electives and 12 credit hours of unrestricted electives.

The culminating experience for thesis-option students in the MS program is the final thesis document and the oral defense of the thesis research.

The culminating, capstone experience for nonthesis students is a technical project, which requires a written and oral presentation of the work, completed as part of the required core course IDS 6916 Simulation Research Methods and Practicum. This project is reviewed by panel experts.


Required Courses—15 Credit Hours

Core—15 Credit Hours

Core courses provide an interdisciplinary framework for all Modeling and Simulation students. Teams of Modeling and Simulation program faculty teach these core courses. Course descriptions can be found in the Catalog Menu at the top of the page under the heading "Courses."

  • IDS 6147 Perspectives on Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 5876 Quantitative Aspects of Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours) 
  • IDS 6148 Human Systems Integration for Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours) or EIN 6258 Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours) or EXP 6541 Advanced Human-Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6145 Simulation Techniques (3 credit hours)
  • Thesis Option: IDS 6262 Research Design for Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • Nonthesis Option: IDS 6916 Simulation Research Methods and Practicum (3 credit hours)

Unrestricted Electives—9 Credit Hours

All Modeling and Simulation MS students must take at least 9 credit hours of unrestricted electives that support the student's area of graduate study. Unrestricted electives must consist of at least 9 credit hours of formal courses, which may include independent study (up to 6 credit hours). The remaining credit may consist of additional thesis (for thesis option students only), directed research, and additional courses as advised appropriately by the faculty adviser and/or program director.  

Thesis Option—6 Credit Hours

Thesis students are required to take an additional 6 credit hours of thesis.

  • IDS 6971 Thesis (6 credit hours)

Nonthesis Option—6 Credit Hours

Restricted Elective—3 Credit Hours

Nonthesis students must select an elective course from the Modeling and Simulation Graduate Program. Appropriate courses include those that follow. Others may be added over time with Program Director approval.

  • IDC 5602 Cybersecurity: A Multidisciplinary Approach (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6601 Behavioral Aspects of Cybersecurity (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6700 Interdisciplinary Approach to Data Visualization (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 5142 Modeling and Simulation for Instructional Design (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6146 Modeling and Simulation Systems (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6149 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6916 Simulation Research Methods and Practicum (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6938 Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) Design (3 credit hours) 

Unrestricted Electives—3 Credit Hours

Nonthesis students are required to take an additional 3 credit hours of unrestricted electives that support the student's area of graduate study.

Modeling and Simulation MS Electives

In addition to successfully enrolling and completing the core courses, students are required to carefully select electives with the guidance of a faculty adviser. Elective choices should be made with the intent to strengthen a research interest and/or area of focus in order to meet the individual student’s educational goals and objectives.

Listed below are suggested courses in various areas of focus or specialization. These course groupings are mere guides, are not exhaustive and are only meant to assist with advising and course selection in order to meet the individual student’s educational goals and objectives. They are not intended to restrict elective choices among focus areas as we strongly encourage Modeling and Simulation students to maintain an interdisciplinary approach to their graduate studies.

If a student identifies another UCF course which may be of value to his/her modeling and simulation research area, but is not already identified in a list below, he/she may request approval from the Graduate Program Director for the course to be used as an elective in the Graduate Plan of Study. All such requests must be made in advance of enrolling in the course.

Those electives categorized as “General” would be appropriate for all students regardless of focus area. The remaining categories are grouped by area of research interest.

General

  • ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6891 IEMS Research Methods (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 5907 Independent Study (variable)
  • IDS 5917 Directed Research (variable)
  • IDS 6908 Independent Study (variable)
  • IDS 6918 Directed Research (variable)
  • IDS 6946 Internship (variable)
  • IDS 7919 Doctoral Research (variable)
  • PHI 5340 Research Methods in Cognitive Sciences (3 credit hours)
  • PSY 6216C Research Methodology (4 credit hours)
  • STA 5205 Experimental Design (3 credit hours)

Fundamentals of Modeling and Simulation

  • EEL 5892 Continuous System Simulation II (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6258 Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6217 Statistical Aspects of Digital Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6532 Object-Oriented Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6700 Interdisciplinary Approach to Data Visualization (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6146 Modeling and Simulation Systems (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6147 Perspectives on Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6149 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6950 Modeling and Simulation Capstone Report Planning (1 credit hour)
  • IDS 6XXX Simulation Techniques (3 credit hours)

Behavioral Cybersecurity

  • CAP 6133 Advanced Topics in Computer Security and Computer Forensics (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6135 Malware and Software Vulnerability Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • CDA 6530 Performance Models of Computers and Networks (3 credit hours)
  • CJE 6688 Cyber Crime and Criminal Justice (3 credit hours)
  • CNT 5008 Computer Communication Networks Architecture (3 credit hours)
  • CNT 5410L Cyber Operations Lab (3 credit hours)
  • CNT 6519 Wireless Security and Forensics (3 credit hours)
  • COT 5405 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 5876 Quantitative Aspects of Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6785 Computer Network Design (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6883 Software Engineering II (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 5256 Human Factors I (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6506 Human Cognition and Learning (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 5602 Cybersecurity: A Multidisciplinary Approach (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6600 Emerging Cyber Issues (1 credit hour)
  • IDC 6601 Behavioral Aspects of Cybersecurity (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6916 Simulation Research Methods and Practicum (3 credit hours)
  • INR 6365 Seminar on Intelligence (3 credit hours)
  • INR 6366 The Intelligence Community (3 credit hours)
  • PHI 6938 ST: Digital Ethics (3 credit hours)
  • STA 5703 Data Mining Methodology I (3 credit hours)
  • STA 5825 Stochastic Processes and Applied Probability Theory (3 credit hours)

Human Systems

  • CAP 6515 Algorithms in Computational Biology (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6671 Intelligent Systems: Robots, Agents, and Humans (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6676 Knowledge Representation (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6432 Transmedia Story Creation (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6812 Digital Interaction for Informal Learning (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5248C Ergonomics (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5248C Ergonomics (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5317 Training System Design (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6215 System Safety Engineering and Management (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6258 Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6649C Intelligent Tutoring Training System Design (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6458 Virtual Teaching and the Digital Educator (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6507 Multimedia for Education and Training (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6601 Instructional Simulation Design for Training and Education (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6614 Instructional Game Design for Training and Education (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6646 Learning, Instructional Design, and Cognitive Neuroscience (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 5208 Sensation and Perception (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 5256 Human Factors I (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6255 Human Performance (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6257 Human Factors II (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6258 Human Factors III (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6506 Human Cognition and Learning (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6541 Advanced Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6148 Human Systems Integration for Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6149 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation (3 credit hours)
  • PHI 5225 Philosophy of Language (3 credit hours)
  • PHI 5325 Topics in Philosophy of Mind (3 credit hours)
  • PHI 5327 Topics in Cognitive Sciences (3 credit hours)
  • PHI 5329 Philosophy of Neuroscience (3 credit hours)
  • PSB 5005 Physiological Psychology (3 credit hours)
  • TTE 6270 Intelligent Transportation Systems (3 credit hours) 

Computer Visualization

  • CAP 5725 Computer Graphics I (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6411 Computer Vision Systems (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6412 Advanced Computer Vision (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6676 Knowledge Representation (3 credit hours)
  • CDA 5106 Advanced Computer Architecture (3 credit hours)
  • COT 5405 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6605 Physical Computing (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6647 Science and Technology of Dynamic Media (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5173 Linear Systems Theory (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5771C Engineering Applications of Computer Graphics (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5820 Image Processing (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5825 Pattern Recognition (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5874 Expert Systems and Knowledge Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6823 Image Processing II (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6843 Machine Perception (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6258 Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6700 Interdisciplinary Approach to Data Visualization (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 5117 Mathematical Modeling (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6118 Introduction to Nonlinear Dynamics (3 credit hours)
  • MAT 5712 Scientific Computing (3 credit hours)

Quantitative Methods for Simulation, Modeling and Analysis

  • CAP 5512 Evolutionary Computation (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6515 Algorithms in Computational Biology (3 credit hours)
  • CDA 6530 Performance Models of Computers and Networks (3 credit hours)
  • COT 5405 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5173 Linear Systems Theory (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5892 Continuous System Simulation II (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6878 Modeling and Artificial Intelligence (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6528 Simulation Based Life Cycle Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5306 Operations Research (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6217 Statistical Aspects of Digital Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6700 Interdisciplinary Approach to Data Visualization (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6149 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 5117 Mathematical Modeling (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6111 Mathematical Statistics (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6118 Introduction to Nonlinear Dynamics (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6207 Optimization Theory (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6385 Applied Numerical Mathematics (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6407 Applied Mathematics I (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6408 Applied Mathematics II (3 credit hours)
  • MAP 6445 Approximation Techniques (3 credit hours)
  • MAT 5712 Scientific Computing (3 credit hours)
  • STA 5703 Data Mining Methodology I (3 credit hours)
  • STA 5825 Stochastic Processes and Applied Probability Theory (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6236 Regression Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6246 Linear Models (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6326 Theoretical Statistics I (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6327 Theoretical Statistics II (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6329 Statistical Applications of Matrix Algebra (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6704 Data Mining Methodology II (3 credit hours)
  • STA 6714 Data Preparation (3 credit hours)

Simulation in Healthcare

  • CAP 6515 Algorithms in Computational Biology (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6671 Intelligent Systems: Robots, Agents, and Humans (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6676 Knowledge Representation (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6647 Science and Technology of Dynamic Media (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6812 Digital Interaction for Informal Learning (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5820 Image Processing (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6823 Image Processing II (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6645 Real-Time Simulation Agents (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • HUM 5802 Applied Contemporary Humanities (3 credit hours)
  • NGR 6717 Introduction to Healthcare Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • NGR 6771L Healthcare Simulation Practicum (variable credit hours)
  • NGR 6794 Organizational Leadership and Operations in Healthcare Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • NGR 6978 Healthcare Simulation Capstone Project (3 credit hours)
  • PHI 5329 Philosophy of Neuroscience (3 credit hours)
  • PSB 5005 Physiological Psychology (3 credit hours)
  • SPA 6417 Cognitive/Communicative Disorders (3 credit hours)
  • SPA 6451 Theory and Clinical Aspects Cognitive-Comm Disorders in Traumatic Brain Injury (3 credit hours)

Interactive Simulation and Intelligent Systems

  • CAP 5512 Evolutionary Computation (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 5610 Machine Learning (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 5636 Advanced Artificial Intelligence (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6671 Intelligent Systems: Robots, Agents, and Humans (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6676 Knowledge Representation (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6812 Digital Interaction for Informal Learning (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5771C Engineering Applications of Computer Graphics (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5874 Expert Systems and Knowledge Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6878 Modeling and Artificial Intelligence (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5251 Usability Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5255C Interactive Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6258 Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6645 Real-Time Simulation Agents (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6647 Intelligent Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6649C Intelligent Tutoring Training System Design (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6613 Instructional System Design (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6149 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation (3 credit hours)

Simulation Infrastructure

  • CAP 6671 Intelligent Systems: Robots, Agents, and Humans (3 credit hours)
  • CAP 6676 Knowledge Representation (3 credit hours)
  • CDA 5106 Advanced Computer Architecture (3 credit hours)
  • CDA 6107 Parallel Computer Architecture (3 credit hours)
  • CDA 6530 Performance Models of Computers and Networks (3 credit hours)
  • CNT 5008 Computer Communication Networks Architecture (3 credit hours)
  • COT 5405 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6605 Physical Computing (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5173 Linear Systems Theory (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5771C Engineering Applications of Computer Graphics (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6762 Performance Analysis of Computer and Communication Systems (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6785 Computer Network Design (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6878 Modeling and Artificial Intelligence (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6883 Software Engineering II (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6885 Software Engineering Quality Assurance Methods (3 credit hours)
  • MAT 5712 Scientific Computing (3 credit hours)

Simulation Management

  • EIN 5108 The Environment of Technical Organizations (3 credit hours) 
  • EIN 5117 Management Information Systems I (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5140 Project Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5356 Cost Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6182 Engineering Management (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6215 System Safety Engineering and Management (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6339 Operations Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6357 Advanced Engineering Economic Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6528 Simulation Based Life Cycle Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5227 Total Quality Improvement (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6224 Quality Management (3 credit hours) 
  • ESI 6358 Decision Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6551C Systems Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • IDC 6700 Interdisciplinary Approach to Data Visualization (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6149 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation (3 credit hours)

Plan of Study

After admission to the Modeling and Simulation MS program, students should file a Graduate Plan of Study (GPS) with the Modeling and Simulation Graduate Program Office.

The purpose of the GPS is to design an appropriate program of coursework to support a student's area of graduate study and to meet the specific educational needs, goals and objectives of that student. The coursework must be selected to form a unified, cohesive plan of study. The plan of study must have 50 percent of its content composed of 6000-level courses.

For thesis students, the GPS should be developed under the supervision of the thesis adviser(s) and members of the Thesis Advisory Committee, although initially it may be constructed under the supervision of the M&S Graduate Program Office. For nonthesis students, the plan of study should be developed under the supervision of the M&S Graduate Program Office.

Changes in the Graduate Plan of Study can be made (due to course offering deletions, schedule conflicts, etc.) and with the approval of the M&S Graduate Program Office.

Graduate Plans of Study for MS students should be on file with the College of Graduate Studies by the end of the student's second major term (based on full-time enrollment) and must be on file by the end of the term prior to the term of expected graduation.

Equipment Fee

Full-time students in the Modeling and Simulation MS program pay a $27 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled. Part-time students pay a $13.50 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled.


Track Curriculum: Professional Science Master's



The curriculum of the Professional Science Master’s track in the Modeling and Simulation MS program has been designed in part using valuable input from leaders in various industrial and governmental sectors of the modeling and simulation communities. Students are required to complete courses in modeling and simulation technical sciences, and business management and/or entrepreneurship. Students may then consider elective courses in highly relatable industries depending upon their career aspirations and graduate program advising.

The PSM track in the Modeling and Simulation MS program requires the completion of 36 credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree. At least 18 credit hours of courses must be at the 6000 level. The capstone requirement for this PSM track is fulfilled by students completing a 3-credit-hour graduate internship.

Required Courses—24 Credit Hours

Required Technical Courses—12 Credit Hours

  • IDS 6147 Perspectives on Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6146 Modeling and Simulation Systems (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5140 Project Engineering (3 credit hours)

Required Business Management/ Entrepreneurial Courses—12 Credit Hours

Students may choose any combination of courses between General Business/ Management and Entrepreneurship to fulfill this requirement. Other courses not on the list may be considered for approval by the Graduate Program Director. All such requests must be made in advance of enrolling in the course.

General Business/ Management
  • EIN 5108 The Environment of Technical Organizations (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5356 Cost Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • INP 6058 Job Analysis and Performance Appraisal (3 credit hours)
  • INP 6317 Work Motivation and Job Attitudes (3 credit hours)
  • INP 6605 Training and Team Performance (3 credit hours)
  • MAN 6245 Organizational Behavior and Development (3 credit hours)
  • MAN 6305 Human Resources Management (3 credit hours)
  • MAN 6448 Conflict Resolution and Negotiation (3 credit hours)
  • MAR 6466 Strategic Supply Chain and Operations Management (3 credit hours)
Entrepreneurship
  • GEB 5516 Technological Entrepreneurship (3 credit hours)*
  • GEB 6115 Entrepreneurship (3 credit hours)
  • GEB 6116 Business Plan Formation (3 credit hours)*
  • GEB 6518 Strategic Innovation (3 credit hours)*

Students who successfully complete the three GEB courses marked with an asterisk (*) are eligible to receive the 9-credit-hour Graduate Certificate in Technology Ventures. These three courses focus on the successful development of the knowledge and skills needed to commercialize science and technology research. Those students interested in business opportunities enabled by scientific and technological innovations will find the coursework involving intellectual property issues, innovation commercialization processes, technology business strategies and business plan formation invaluable to their success.

Students desiring to obtain the Graduate Certificate in Technology Ventures must apply for the certificate program prior to enrolling in the third GEB course in order to be awarded the graduate certificate.

Elective Courses—9 Credit Hours

Students should carefully select electives with the guidance of a faculty adviser. Elective choices should be made with the intent to strengthen a professional interest and/or area of focus in order to meet the individual student's educational and professional goals and objectives.

Listed below are suggested courses in various areas of focus or specialization. These course groupings are mere guides, are not exhaustive, and are only meant to assist with advising and course selection in order to meet the individual student's educational goals and objectives. They are not intended to restrict elective choices among focus areas as we strongly encourage M&S PSM students to maintain an interdisciplinary approach to their graduate studies.

If a student identifies another UCF course that may be of value to his/her M&S interests, but is not already identified in a list below, he/she may request approval from the Graduate Program Director for the course to be used as an elective in the Graduate Plan of Study. All such requests must be made in advance of enrolling in the course.

Government/ Defense Contracting
  • EIN 6528 Simulation Based Life Cycle Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • PAD 5850 Grant and Contract Management (3 credit hours)
Instructional Design for Entertainment and Education
  • DIG 5137 Information Architecture (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6836 Design and Development for Texts and Technology (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6647 Science and Technology of Dynamic Media (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6614 Instructional Game Design for Training and Education (3 credit hours)
  • ENC 6426 Visual Texts and Technology (3 credit hours)
Health Services Systems
  • HSA 6119 Health Care Organization and Management (3 credit hours) - offered Spring
  • PHC 6000 Epidemiology (3 credit hours) - offered Summer
  • HSC 6636 Issues and Trends in the Health Professions (3 credit hours) - offered every semester
Nonprofit/ Public Policy
  • PAD 6142 Nonprofit Organizations (3 credit hours)
  • PAD 5041 Ethics and Values in Public Administration (3 credit hours)
  • PAD 5850 Grant and Contract Management (3 credit hours)

Internship—3 Credit Hours

  • IDS 6946 Graduate Internship (3 credit hours)

Additionally, all students pursuing the Professional Science Master's must enroll in the following course: 

  • IDS 5949 Co-op Ed/Work Experience (0 credit hours)

Students must register for IDS 6946 and IDS 5949 simultaneously. Students must complete the course with a satisfactory (S) grade. If the student does not complete the course with a satisfactory grade, the student will be asked to repeat the course to meet program requirements.

Equipment Fee

Students in the Modeling and Simulation MS program pay a $27 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled. Part-time students pay $13.50 per semester.


Thesis Requirements

University Thesis Requirements

A thesis is optional for this program; the following information is intended for those choosing to complete a thesis.

The College of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation page contains information on the university’s requirements for thesis formatting, format review, defenses, final submission, and more. A step-by-step completion guide is also available at Completing Your Thesis or Dissertation.

All university deadlines are listed in the Academic Calendar. Your program or college may have other earlier deadlines; please check with your program and college staff for additional deadlines.

The following requirements must be met by thesis students in their final term:

  • Submit a properly formatted file for initial format review by the format review deadline
  • Submit the Thesis and Dissertation Release Option form well before the defense
  • Defend by the defense deadline
  • Receive format approval (if not granted upon initial review)
  • Submit signed approval form by final submission deadline
  • Submit final thesis document by final submission deadline

Students must format their thesis according to the standards outlined at Formatting the ETD. Formatting questions or issues can be submitted to the Format Help page in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. Format reviews and final submission must be completed in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. The Thesis Approval Form is also available in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site.

The College of Graduate Studies offers several thesis and dissertation Workshops each term. Students are highly encouraged to attend these workshops early in the thesis process to fully understand the above policies and procedures.

The College of Graduate Studies thesis and dissertation office is best reached by email at editor@ucf.edu. 

Graduate Research

For information on graduate research opportunities including a listing of research laboratories visit the Research Labs webpage, the Research Projects webpage and the Research Collection webpage on the Institute for Simulation and Training website.

Financial Support

For information on scholarship opportunities for this discipline, visit the Amico Scholarship webpage  on the Institute for Simulation and Training website.

Graduate Student Associations

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is UCF's graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students' personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu. For individual department or graduate program organizations, please see program advisor.

Professional Development

Visit the Institution for Simulation and Training website for research opportunities.  Also visit the Seminar Series webpage  on the Institute for Simulation and Training website.
 

Coordinated by the College of Graduate Studies, the Pathways to Success program offers free development opportunities for graduate students including workshops in Academic Integrity, Graduate Grantsmanship, Graduate Teaching, Personal Development, Professional Development, and Research. For more information and how to register, please visit www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/pathways/.  

Job Search

For job search information for IST graduate students and alumni visit the Jobs webpage  on the Institute for Simulation and Training website.

Forms

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s work and presenting it as your own. Any ideas, data, text, media or materials taken from another source (either written or verbal) must be fully acknowledged.a) A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without acknowledgment.b) A student must give credit to the originality of others whenever:

  1. Directly quoting another person's actual words, whether oral or written;
  2. Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theories;
  3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others, whether oral or written;
  4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
  5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgment.

When using the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, students must give credit to the original source at the location or place in the document where that source's material is found as well as provide bibliographic information at the end of the document. When students are verbally discussing the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, they must give credit to the original source at the time they speak about that source. In this manner, students must make clear (so there is no doubt) within their written or verbal materials, which parts are gained from other sources, and which are their own original ideas, theories, formulas, graphics, and pictures.The Office of Student Conduct has a set of criteria that determines if students are in violation of plagiarism. This set of criteria may be set to a higher standard in graduate programs. Therefore, a student may not be found in violation of plagiarism by the Office of Student Conduct, but a professor or program requiring higher standards of attribution and citation may find a student in violation of plagiarism and administer program level sanctions. The standard in doctoral programs should be the highest as students earning these degrees are expected to be experts in their fields and producing independent work that contributes knowledge to their discipline.

Example of Material that has been appropriately cited:

Paraphrased Material

Source: Osborne, Richard, ed. How to Grow Annuals. 2nd ed. Menlo Park: Lane, 1974. Print. Page 24: As a recent authority has pointed out, for a dependable long-blooming swatch of soft blue in your garden, ageratum is a fine choice. From early summer until frost, ageratum is continuously covered with clustered heads of fine, silky, fringed flowers in dusty shades of lavender-blue, lavender-pink or white. The popular dwarf varieties grow in mounds six to twelve inches high and twelve inches across; they make fine container plants. Larger types grow up to three feet tall. Ageratum makes an excellent edging.

Use and Adaptation of the Material:

You can depend on ageratum if you want some soft blue in your garden. It blooms through the summer and the flowers, soft, small, and fringed, come in various shades of lavender. The small varieties which grow in mounds are very popular, especially when planted in containers. There are also larger varieties. Ageratum is good as a border plant (Osborne 24).

Explanation:

The writer has done a good job of paraphrasing what could be considered common knowledge (available in a number of sources), but because the structure and progression of detail is someone else’s, the writer has acknowledged the source. This the writer can do at the end of the paragraph since he or she has not used the author’s words.

The above example was provided by Northwestern University.

Northwestern University, Sept. 2016. “Academic Integrity: A Basic Guide.” Accessed 20 September 2017.

For more information about Academic Honesty, Click here.

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