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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2017-2018

Program Info

Last Updated 2013-07-24

Engineering Management MSEM



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

Introduction to the Graduate Programs

The mission of the Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems is to be recognized as an academic and research leader through quality graduate programs. The industrial engineering graduate programs are structured to support Central Florida’s emergence as a national center of high technology, while also supporting the diverse service industries in the region and throughout the nation. The graduate program enrollment rate has also made the IEMS graduate program the second largest graduate program of all IE Departments in the country.

The IEMS Master’s programs attract well-qualified students with excellent engineering or scientific backgrounds.

Master’s Programs

The Master’s degree programs are designed to produce highly skilled industrial engineers, and other skilled professionals in areas such as human engineering, ergonomics, quality systems, systems engineering, system operation and modeling, Training systems and interactive simulation and  and leaders for the global economy.

The MS program provides an excellent Master’s level education for students in the Industrial Engineering MS degrees in Human Systems Engineering/Ergonomics, Interactive Simulation and Training Systems, Quality Systems Engineering, Systems operations and Modeling, and Systems Engineering. Each program area of specialty offers a curriculum that guarantees breadth and depth of course areas needed to adequately develop the knowledge base and expertise of students in the program.

Note for International Students

International students may only take one course per semester in a totally online format while attending UCF on a F-1 visa. Courses in this program can be taken in mixed mode for international students at UCF or fully online for international students who are not on visas. If you have questions, please consult the International Service Center at www.intl.ucf.edu.

Program Requirements

The MS curriculum offers tracks in Human Systems Engineering/Ergonomics, Interactive Simulation and Training Systems, Quality Systems Engineering, Systems Operations and Modeling, and Systems Engineering.

Degree Plan of Study

All graduate students need to complete their plan of study during the first semester of the graduate program. Students who have not yet established a plan of study, students who would like to change their current program, or students who have any questions about their current programs, need to talk to the Graduate Director as soon as possible. The plan of study is a contract specifying degree requirements between the student and the University of Central Florida. It is very important to have a plan of study established as soon as possible to assure that the student is meeting all requirements. An approved copy must be filed with the department.

The Plan of Study is the official contract between the student and the University of Central Florida.  It should be finished before completion of nine semester hours of graduate courses.  The Plan of Study specifies the required courses for the particular degree and identifies appropriate electives to support that degree.  Unlike undergraduate students, graduate students are not "under the catalog at time of admission." Program requirements change from time to time and students will generally have to meet the latest requirements unless previous requirements are specified in the approved Plan of Study. If a student has completed an undergraduate course similar to a required graduate course (e.g., discrete systems simulation), that particular graduate course will be waived and another course from the general area must be substituted.

With regard to electives, the selected electives should support the area of study.  Generally, any course offered by the IEMS Department will be an acceptable elective.  In addition, courses offered by other engineering departments, computer science, mathematics, statistics, psychology, or business administration may be acceptable electives. Identification of electives must be done in a Plan of Study and approved by the Advisor and Graduate Director.

Plan of Study forms can be downloaded from the IEMS Website. After the student completes the form by identifying an anticipated course sequence, the anticipated semesters in which courses will be completed, and appropriate electives, the student will then obtain the Advisor's approval, and an official form will be generated on the computer for signature and approval. The Plan of Study may be revised as necessary with the approval of the Advisor and the IEMS Graduate Director.

IEMS Grievance Procedures

If a student feels that his or her grievance can be solved at the departmental level he/she must first go to the IEMS Graduate Director, to whom the student can confidentially disclose his/her concern. The Graduate Director will then make a decision based upon the most appropriate course of action. The standard grievance evaluation procedure will typically categorize the student’s grievance into one of three scenarios:

  1. The Graduate Director will evaluate and assess the matter and resolve the student’s grievance in the most appropriate manner.
  2. In student grievances involving a department faculty member, the Graduate director will refer the student to the Department Chair for assessment and resolution.
  3. If the student’s grievance concerns a discrepancy with a program level examination or program performance requirement, the Graduate Director will assign the student’s complaint to a faculty/student committee for review.

Curriculum

This program can be taken entirely through the Florida Engineering Educational Delivery System (FEEDS), which provides video-streamed versions of classes over the Internet.

The Engineering Management MSEM degree requires an undergraduate degree in Engineering or a closely related discipline. Students with undergraduate degrees outside of industrial engineering may be required to take additional prerequisites. An approved program of study must be developed in consultation with the graduate program director. The total number of hours is 30 credit hours.


Prerequisites

Mathematics through Calculus II (MAP 2312)

Required Courses—12 Credit Hours

  • ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5140 Project Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6551 Systems Architecting (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6357 Advanced Engineering Economics Analysis (3 credit hours)

Concentration Courses (9 Credit Hours)

  • EIN 5108 The Environment of Technical Organizations (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6370 Innovation in Engineering Design (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6182 Engineering Management (3 credit hours)

Thesis Option—9 Credit Hours

Thesis students must complete an indepedent research project and then write and successfully defend their thesis. Furthermore, an additional 3 credit hours of electives are required beyond the 21 credit hours of required courses described above.

  • EIN 6971 Thesis (6 credit hours)
  • Elective (3 credit hours)

Nonthesis Option—9 Credit Hours

Nonthesis students must take 9 additional credit hours of electives beyond the 21 credit hours of required courses described above.

Comprehensive Examination

Nonthesis students must successfully pass an oral comprehensive examination to fulfill degree requirements. The comprehensive examination for MSEM graduates is satisfied by successful completion of a capstone project and oral presentation as a requirement for passing EIN 6182 Engineering Management. Please see the program director for further details.

At least one-half of the credit hours of all courses in a master's program of study must be at the 6000 level or higher. Students on assistantships must take 9 credit hours per semester to satisfy the university's requirement for full-time status. Most students working full time take 6 credit hours per semester. At that rate, the program can be completed in 6 semesters or less. However, students with more time available can finish the program in 3 semesters.

Equipment Fee

Students in the Engineering Management MSEM program pay a $90 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled. For part-time students, the equipment fee is $45 per semester.


Track Curriculum: Professional Engineering Management (PEM), Professional Science Master's

The Professional Engineering Management (PEM) track in the Engineering Management MSEM program focuses on effective decision-making and successful project delivery in engineering and technological organizations. The program is tailored to the needs of the experienced, working professional.

The Engineering Management MSEM program requires an undergraduate degree in Engineering or a closely related discipline. Students with undergraduate degrees outside of industrial engineering may be required to take additional prerequisite courses.

Research studies are required in one or more courses. The research study and report will focus on reviewing and analyzing contemporary research in the profession in order to help students acquire knowledge and skills pertaining to research-based best practices.



Prerequisites

  • Mathematics through Calculus II (MAC 2312)

Master Core Courses—12 Credit Hours

  • ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5140 Project Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6551 Systems Architecting (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6357 Advanced Engineering Economic Analysis (3 credit hours)

Concentration Courses—9 Credit Hours

  • EIN 5108 The Environment of Technical Organizations (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6370 Innovation in Engineering Design (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6182 Engineering Management (3 credit hours)

Elective Courses—9 Credit Hours

Students take an additional 9 credit hours of electives.

Comprehensive Examination

Students must successfully pass an oral comprehensive examination to fulfill degree requirements. Please see the program director for further details.

Equipment Fee

Students in the Engineering Management MSEM program pay a $90 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled. For part-time students, the equipment fee is $45 per semester.


Course Schedule

IEMS’s Course Schedule until Summer 2017 can be found in the IEMS website (five year plan).

Thesis Requirements

University Thesis Requirements

A thesis is optional for this program; the following information is intended for those choosing to complete a thesis.

The College of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation page contains information on the university’s requirements for thesis formatting, format review, defenses, final submission, and more. A step-by-step completion guide is also available at Completing Your Thesis or Dissertation.

All university deadlines are listed in the Academic Calendar. Your program or college may have other earlier deadlines; please check with your program and college staff for additional deadlines.

The following requirements must be met by thesis students in their final term:

  • Submit a properly formatted file for initial format review by the format review deadline
  • Submit the Thesis and Dissertation Release Option form well before the defense
  • Defend by the defense deadline
  • Receive format approval (if not granted upon initial review)
  • Submit signed approval form by final submission deadline
  • Submit final thesis document by final submission deadline

Students must format their thesis according to the standards outlined at Formatting the ETD. Formatting questions or issues can be submitted to the Format Help page in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. Format reviews and final submission must be completed in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. The Thesis Approval Form is also available in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site.

The College of Graduate Studies offers several thesis and dissertation Workshops each term. Students are highly encouraged to attend these workshops early in the thesis process to fully understand the above policies and procedures.

The College of Graduate Studies thesis and dissertation office is best reached by email at editor@ucf.edu.

Thesis Proposal and Committee Formation

Students pursuing a Master’s degree have the option of writing a thesis as part of their graduation requirement should they decide not to take the Oral Examination. All students who are working on funded research projects are expected to complete a thesis. The purpose of a thesis is to demonstrate the student’s ability to do original research or to develop an original application of a particular methodology to a new area. The thesis endeavor in the IEMS Department is a two semester enterprise, composed of a thesis proposal and a thesis defense. Initially the student will register for 3 thesis hours designated for the thesis proposal and once he/she passes the proposal, the student will be allowed to register for an additional 3 hours to complete the defense. Students may only register for 3 thesis hours per semester, and must allow for one semester’s length between proposal and defense.

In beginning the process, the student must first develop a relevant thesis topic and then approach a faculty member about serving as his/her thesis committee chairperson.  This topic can develop from an advisor's interests, the student's interests, or the funded research being conducted (where cases permit).  For those students working on research projects, it is typically required that the thesis be related to the funded research being done by the student. 

It is the student's responsibility to develop the thesis topic and proposal, and to convince the potential chairperson that it is a worthy topic and that he/she should be willing to commit significant time to advise the student on the topic.

The thesis committee should be formed prior to the student registering for thesis hours, and must include at least three members; two of the members of the committee must be from the IEMS Department.  Thesis committee membership must be approved by the Department Chair at the time that it is formed.

If the Master’s student and thesis committee chairperson/advisor agree on a topic, the student must prepare a thesis proposal for the Committee which lays out the direction and extent of the research.  The proposal should describe the research expectations and recognize how the contribution is identified.  This is, in a sense, a second contract that specifies the expected level of effort and outcome that will satisfy the thesis requirement.

The student and advisor are responsible for the proper preparation of the written thesis.  Normally, the student submits draft copies to the advisor for review.  A draft copy must be also approved by the College of Graduate Studies for format considerations. After appropriate revisions, a revised draft is submitted to the thesis committee members for their review at least two weeks prior to the scheduled defense date. Comments from the committee members are usually submitted to the student at the time of the defense. After the defense, the various comments are addressed in a final revision that is submitted to the advisor and the committee for final approval.  Students should anticipate that this review cycle can be time consuming. Once the student has completed the revision process and passed his/her thesis defense, an electronic copy of the student’s thesis must be submitted for University archives and academic access.

If a student does not finish the thesis in his/her second semester, the student may register for one additional hour of thesis in the following semester (up to a maximum of two semesters) to finish. If for some reason the student does not finish the thesis defense in the overall maximum of four semesters the student may choose to either change to the non-thesis option or leave the program. If the student changes to the non-thesis option, the thesis hours completed may not be used as part of the new plan of study.

Thesis Defense

Every thesis is defended in a public forum.  The student should schedule the defense with the advisor and the committee members at a mutually agreeable time.  University-wide notice must be given at least one week before the scheduled defense.  It is the student's responsibility to ensure that the proper notice is prepared and distributed (see Thesis Manual for format) in time to meet this deadline.  The student is responsible for securing a suitable room for presenting the thesis defense.  In preparing for the thesis defense, the student should work with the advisor to develop a suitable presentation.  Note that not all students pass the thesis defense the first time.  Students should allow sufficient slack in the semester in case a repeat defense is required. If for some reason the student does not pass the thesis defense on a second attempt the student may choose to either change to the non-thesis option or leave the program. If the student changes to the non-thesis option, the thesis hours completed may not be used as part of the new plan of study.

If the student does pass his/her thesis defense, an electronic copy of the student’s thesis must be submitted for University archives and academic access.

For a thesis (EIN 6971), or doctoral dissertation (EIN 7980), satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) grades are used to reflect student progress in these courses. Should a student in a given term be given an incomplete (I), then this grade should be changed to an S or U, upon completion of the work. Other grades may not be assigned in these courses. Students who do not maintain satisfactory progress in their research, as determined by their thesis or dissertation advisory committee, may be reverted to post-baccalaureate status.

For further information of thesis and dissertation matters please refer to the “Thesis and Dissertation Advisory Committee” section of the UCF Graduate Catalog.

Graduate Research

Faculty Research

The Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems faculty members are all actively involved in research projects and collaborations in addition to their teaching responsibilities. Some of the companies and agencies for whom IEMS faculty do research are

  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Office of Naval Research
  • Environmental Research and Education Foundation
  • Walt Disney World Co.
  • Boeing Company
  • Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC)
  • United Space Alliance
  • Technology Solutions, Inc.
  • NASA
  • US Army

Current faculty research projects and interests include, but are not limited to:

  • Quality management and performance excellence
  • Lean six sigma applications in manufacturing, service and healthcare organizations
  • Business process reengineering
  • Manufacturing systems engineering
  • Strategic management
  • Strategic planning
  • Organizational transformations and change management
  • Program/project management.
  • Modeling and simulation
  • Multicriteria optimization
  • Data mining
  • Applied operations research
  • Sustainability in supply chain networks
  • Facility logistics
  • Applied Operations Research
  • Supply Chain Management Modeling
  • Distribution Center Design
  • Healthcare Logistics
  • Data mining including supervised and unsupervised learning and their applications in Industrial Engineering and Biomedicine
  • Optimization methods in data mining
  • Network analysis with application to infrastructure reliability
  • Operations research 

To learn more, please visit iems.ucf.edu/research/areas-of-research.

Financial Support

Graduate Assistantships and Fellowships

The Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems employs a number of graduate teaching assistants and researchers in order to aid students financially during their academic careers. IEMS holds potential graduate assistants to the same application requirements as all other University departments. Applicants can find this information in the UCF Graduate Catalog online, and for specific IEMS fellowships and assistantships please visit the IEMS website

Graduate Teaching Assistant applicants who have English as their second language will be evaluated as part of the GTA Orientation that is offered in August each year by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning. This requirement applies to all students from countries where English is not the native language; however, such students will be exempt if they have completed a previous degree from an accredited U.S. college or university. Only exempted students and those who have attended the GTA Orientation and satisfactorily passed the evaluation of their English-speaking skills may be employed as GTAs. More information on this requirement can be obtained in the UCF Graduate Catalog.

Students employed as Graduate Assistants, Graduate Teaching Assistants, or in any other paid position serving the University of Central Florida are wholly responsible for assuring timely receipt of financial support (i.e. submitting time sheets, tuition waivers, etc.). Within the Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems students must follow the pay periods established by the University and submit their time cards every two weeks. If a student fails to turn in his/her time card before the end of the designated pay period, his or her hours will be processed during the next pay cycle. The duration of the student’s financial support correlates with his or her status as either a student or student worker within IEMS; it is up to the discretion of the Department to determine the full duration of a student’s financial support.

All international students attending the University of Central Florida are encouraged to apply for employment within the school, but in order to do so students must have their I-20 authorized by the International Services Center (ISC) before such employment can begin. For more information on the requirements for the employment of international students please visit the International Student Employment section of the Graduate Catalog.

Graduate Student Associations

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is UCF's graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students' personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu. For individual department or graduate program organizations, please see program advisor. 

Professional Development

Professional Development Programs

The University of Central Florida offers students the opportunities to continue their professional development by participating in a variety of programs.

The Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Certificate Program (known before as GTA Certificate Program), sponsored by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, offers those graduate students interested in teaching university courses during their time of study at UCF, the opportunity to gain the skills necessary to do so. Students participating in the program will receive group and individualized instruction by Faculty Center staff and experienced UCF professors, as well as textbooks and materials. For more information on the Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Certificate Program and its requirements please visit www.fctl.ucf.edu/Events/GTAPrograms/.

The University of Central Florida employs a Career Services and Experimental Learning Facility to aid students in their endeavors through their academic careers and after. Please visit the Career Services and Experimental Learning Facility website, www.career.ucf.edu, for more information on the services offered.

The College of Graduate Studies sponsors a Graduate Research Forum which features poster displays and oral presentations representing UCF’s diverse colleges and disciplines. The Research Forum is an opportunity for students to showcase their research and creative projects and to receive valuable feedback from faculty judges. For more information on the Graduate Research Forum please visit here.

Pathways to Success Workshops

Coordinated by the College of Graduate Studies, the Pathways to Success program offers free development opportunities for graduate students including workshops in Academic Integrity, Graduate Grantsmanship, Graduate Teaching, Personal Development, Professional Development, and Research. For more information and how to register, please visit www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/pathways/

Internships

For information concerning internships, please visit the IEMS website, or make an appointment to speak with the Associate Chair directly.

Awards and Special Recognition

UCF sponsors awards for excellence in graduate student teaching and for excellence in thesis and dissertation research. University-level award winners will receive $1,500 cash awards. For more information regarding the application/nomination process please visite the Graduate Studies website.

Forms

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s work and presenting it as your own. Any ideas, data, text, media or materials taken from another source (either written or verbal) must be fully acknowledged.a) A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without acknowledgment.b) A student must give credit to the originality of others whenever:

  1. Directly quoting another person's actual words, whether oral or written;
  2. Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theories;
  3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others, whether oral or written;
  4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
  5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgment.

When using the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, students must give credit to the original source at the location or place in the document where that source's material is found as well as provide bibliographic information at the end of the document. When students are verbally discussing the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, they must give credit to the original source at the time they speak about that source. In this manner, students must make clear (so there is no doubt) within their written or verbal materials, which parts are gained from other sources, and which are their own original ideas, theories, formulas, graphics, and pictures.The Office of Student Conduct has a set of criteria that determines if students are in violation of plagiarism. This set of criteria may be set to a higher standard in graduate programs. Therefore, a student may not be found in violation of plagiarism by the Office of Student Conduct, but a professor or program requiring higher standards of attribution and citation may find a student in violation of plagiarism and administer program level sanctions. The standard in doctoral programs should be the highest as students earning these degrees are expected to be experts in their fields and producing independent work that contributes knowledge to their discipline.

Example of Material that has been appropriately cited:

Paraphrased Material

Source: Osborne, Richard, ed. How to Grow Annuals. 2nd ed. Menlo Park: Lane, 1974. Print. Page 24: As a recent authority has pointed out, for a dependable long-blooming swatch of soft blue in your garden, ageratum is a fine choice. From early summer until frost, ageratum is continuously covered with clustered heads of fine, silky, fringed flowers in dusty shades of lavender-blue, lavender-pink or white. The popular dwarf varieties grow in mounds six to twelve inches high and twelve inches across; they make fine container plants. Larger types grow up to three feet tall. Ageratum makes an excellent edging.

Use and Adaptation of the Material:

You can depend on ageratum if you want some soft blue in your garden. It blooms through the summer and the flowers, soft, small, and fringed, come in various shades of lavender. The small varieties which grow in mounds are very popular, especially when planted in containers. There are also larger varieties. Ageratum is good as a border plant (Osborne 24).

Explanation:

The writer has done a good job of paraphrasing what could be considered common knowledge (available in a number of sources), but because the structure and progression of detail is someone else’s, the writer has acknowledged the source. This the writer can do at the end of the paragraph since he or she has not used the author’s words.

The above example was provided by Northwestern University.

Northwestern University, Sept. 2016. “Academic Integrity: A Basic Guide.” Accessed 20 September 2017.

For more information about Academic Honesty, Click here.

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