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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2017-2018

Program Info

Last Updated 2017-04-20



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

Instructional Systems Track (available online and in mixed mode)

The Master of Arts (MA) degree in Instructional Design and Technology requires a minimum of 36 credit hours and is designed to meet the needs of prospective and practicing professionals in various setting. The program enables candidates to complete courses in totally online Web and mixed mode (with one face-to-face meeting every other week). It also enables candidates to pursue careers in business and industry, K12 and higher education by offering tracks in:

  • Educational Technology
  • Instructional Systems
  • e-Learning

Similarities and differences between the three MA professional tracks: 

Target PopulationEd. Teche-LearningInstructional Systems

Educators
(PreK-12 and Higher Education)

X

X

 

Instructional Designers
(Business and Industry and Higher Education)

 

X

X

Although there are considerable overlaps and the differences are a matter of focus, rather than actual content, the Ed. Tech. Track is designed primarily to help Educators in PreK-12 and Higher Education to use and integrate computer and digital technology to enhance learning. In contrast, the Instructional Systems Track is designed primarily to prepare Instructional Designers for work in business and industry, to develop and enhance their ability to analyze and design training and educational programs. The e-Learning Track is designed for both Educators (who want to learn how to design and deliver totally online and hybrid courses) and Instructional Designers (who are now being hired by many universities and colleges across the country to help faculty design and deliver totally online and hybrid courses). The following provides more detail about each track.

Educational Technology Track (available online and in mixed mode)

Educational Technology is a program for educators in PreK-12 and Higher Education looking for ways to increase their satisfaction and become highly skilled at successfully integrating technology into the curriculum. The skills and knowledge gained through this program allow educators to enhance their current job as well as seek new career paths in the field of education. Educators who graduate from this program have the skills to become: technology coordinators, instructors at the community college and university level, computer teachers and more. The Educational Technology program is exciting and applicable to your current teaching situation. The program provides an opportunity for study, research and professional training. It requires a great deal of independent thinking, and emphasis placed on the cultivation of scholarly attitudes and methods.

Curriculum


Examination Requirements

Comprehensive Exams

All master's and doctoral degree candidates are required to take a comprehensive exam. If you are Masters degree candidate, you must pass the exam during the final semester of coursework and/or internship. If you are a Doctoral degree candidate, you must pass the exam to qualify for dissertation hours.

Comprehensive exams consist of summative open book essay questions that are customized for your individual plan of study. You should interact with your program advisor to prepare a study guide before the exam. You may use any resource to study for exam using your guide.The exam will be sent to you via email on a designated date (typically on a Friday before 5pm) for you to work on over a weekend. You are to then submit your written answers to the faculty member who sent you the exam via email by midnight on a designated date.

At least one faculty member (for master's degree seeking students) or two faculty members (for doctoral degree seeking students) will review your answers to determine if you (a) pass as is with no condition, (b) pass with conditions, or (c) not pass.

If you pass with no conditions, no further action is required. If you pass with conditions, you will have to address the conditions specified in feedback given to you by program faculty (e.g., address comments and follow-up questions about your answers in either written or oral format). If you do not pass, you must register for and retake the exam the following term.

To take the comprehensive exam, you must:

Successfully complete all required core and required specialization courses.

Register to take comprehensive exam immediately before or at the beginning of the semester you plan to take the exam (the form is available from the College of Education Academic Advising Office or from program assistant, Lana Gidusko.

For Master's degree students pursuing the e-Learning track, please contact Dr. Glenda Gunter to discuss your comprehensive exam.

For Master's degree students pursuing the Educational Technology track, please contact Dr. Richard Hartshorne to discuss your comprehensive exam.

For all doctoral candidates and master's degree students pursuing the Instructional Systems track, please schedule a meeting with Dr. Atsusi Hirumi to generate a exam study guide (typically, 9-10 questions) at the beginning of the term in which you are to take exam.

Study for exam using guide to focus your efforts.

Take exam on specified date and follow directions to submit as discussed with your program advisor.

Financial Support

College, department and program assistantships depend on grant/project funding. Some assistantships come with tuition waivers, others do not. The best way to earn such a graduate assistant position is to meet with faculty across the college in person. Typically, faculty like to get to know students (e.g., in class) before hiring them for such positions. However, you may complete the Graduate Assistantship Application Form and submit it to Erica Mendoza (emendoza@mail.ucf.edu) who will keep you application and resume on file for consideration as Assistantships become available.

Professional Development

For a listing of professional organizations for the discipline, visit the Instructional Technology Professional Organization's webpage.

For a listing of publications for the discipline, visit the Publications Related to Instructional Technology webpage.

Job Search

For a listing of job search resources visit the Instructional Design and Technology Job Related Recruitment Agencies webpage.

Forms

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s work and presenting it as your own. Any ideas, data, text, media or materials taken from another source (either written or verbal) must be fully acknowledged.a) A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without acknowledgment.b) A student must give credit to the originality of others whenever:

  1. Directly quoting another person's actual words, whether oral or written;
  2. Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theories;
  3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others, whether oral or written;
  4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
  5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgment.

When using the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, students must give credit to the original source at the location or place in the document where that source's material is found as well as provide bibliographic information at the end of the document. When students are verbally discussing the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, they must give credit to the original source at the time they speak about that source. In this manner, students must make clear (so there is no doubt) within their written or verbal materials, which parts are gained from other sources, and which are their own original ideas, theories, formulas, graphics, and pictures.The Office of Student Conduct has a set of criteria that determines if students are in violation of plagiarism. This set of criteria may be set to a higher standard in graduate programs. Therefore, a student may not be found in violation of plagiarism by the Office of Student Conduct, but a professor or program requiring higher standards of attribution and citation may find a student in violation of plagiarism and administer program level sanctions. The standard in doctoral programs should be the highest as students earning these degrees are expected to be experts in their fields and producing independent work that contributes knowledge to their discipline.

Example of Material that has been appropriately cited:

Paraphrased Material

Source: Osborne, Richard, ed. How to Grow Annuals. 2nd ed. Menlo Park: Lane, 1974. Print. Page 24: As a recent authority has pointed out, for a dependable long-blooming swatch of soft blue in your garden, ageratum is a fine choice. From early summer until frost, ageratum is continuously covered with clustered heads of fine, silky, fringed flowers in dusty shades of lavender-blue, lavender-pink or white. The popular dwarf varieties grow in mounds six to twelve inches high and twelve inches across; they make fine container plants. Larger types grow up to three feet tall. Ageratum makes an excellent edging.

Use and Adaptation of the Material:

You can depend on ageratum if you want some soft blue in your garden. It blooms through the summer and the flowers, soft, small, and fringed, come in various shades of lavender. The small varieties which grow in mounds are very popular, especially when planted in containers. There are also larger varieties. Ageratum is good as a border plant (Osborne 24).

Explanation:

The writer has done a good job of paraphrasing what could be considered common knowledge (available in a number of sources), but because the structure and progression of detail is someone else’s, the writer has acknowledged the source. This the writer can do at the end of the paragraph since he or she has not used the author’s words.

The above example was provided by Northwestern University.

Northwestern University, Sept. 2016. “Academic Integrity: A Basic Guide.” Accessed 20 September 2017.

For more information about Academic Honesty, Click here.

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