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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2017-2018

Program Info

Last Updated 2014-03-13

Career and Technical Education MA



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

The Career and Technical Education MA program requires a minimum of 42-45 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree, including 9 credit hours of education foundation core courses, 9 credit hours of career education core courses, and 21 credit hours of adviser-approved courses focused on a specialization within the field. The program also requires an internship (6 credit hours) or a research report (3 credit hours).

A core class in the curriculum, required of all students, is the research methods course where examples are related directly to career education. The internship is an independent learning activity that takes place in face-to-face or web-based authentic setting in which students must apply, reflect upon, and refine knowledge and skills acquired in the program. The internship experience gives students full control of the operational setting where they are placed (e.g., such as primary face-to-face or web classroom teacher while being observed and mentored by a supervising teacher and UCF faculty member).

Independent Learning

The internship is an independent learning activity that takes place in face-to-face or web-based authentic settings in which students must apply, reflect upon, and refine knowledge and skills acquired in the program. The internship experience gives students full control of the operational setting where they are placed (e.g., such as primary face-to-face or web classroom teacher while being observed and mentored by a supervising teacher and UCF faculty member).

Curriculum

The Career and Technical Education MA program requires a minimum of 42-45 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree, including 9 credit hours of education foundation core courses, 9 credit hours of career education core courses, and 21 credit hours of adviser-approved courses focused on a specialization within the field. The program also requires an internship (6 credit hours) or a research report (3 credit hours).


A core class in the curriculum, required of all students, is the research methods course where examples are related directly to career education. The internship is an independent learning activity that takes place in face-to-face or web-based authentic settings in which students must apply, reflect upon, and refine knowledge and skills acquired in the program. The internship experience gives students full control of the operational setting where they are placed (e.g., such as primary face-to-face or web classroom teacher while being observed and mentored by a supervising teacher and UCF faculty member).

Required Courses—18 Credit Hours

Education Foundation Core—Select 9 Credit Hours

  • EDF 6727 Critical Analysis of Social, Ethical, Legal, and Safety Issues Related to Education (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6504 Adult Learning (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6155 Lifespan Human Development and Learning (3 credit hours)
  • LAE 5337 Literacy Strategies for Middle and Secondary Teaching (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 5085 Teaching Language Minority Students in K-12 Classrooms (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6415 Principles of Instruction and Classroom Management (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6237 Principles of Learning and Introduction to Classroom Assessment (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6432 Measurement and Evaluation in Education (3 credit hours) or EDF 6401 Statistics for Educational Data (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6886 Multicultural Education (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6725 Critical Issues in Urban Education (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6481 Fundamentals of Graduate Research in Education (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6517 Perspectives on Education (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6329 Quality Teaching Practices (3 credit hours)

Career Education Core—9 Credit Hours

  • ECT 6791 Research in Career Education (3 credit hours)
  • ECW 6067 History of Career Education in the United States (3 credit hours)
  • ECW 6666 Issues in Career Education (3 credit hours)

Elective Courses—21 Credit Hours

Students select elective courses in an area of specialization after consultation with their adviser.  The areas of specialization may include: health, technical training, teaching adults, business education, Graduate Certificates or another area approved by the adviser. 

Internship Option—6 Credit Hours

  • ECT 6946 Graduate Internship (6 credit hours)

Research Report Option—3 Credit Hours

  • ECT 6909 Research Report (2,1 credit hours)

Co-requisites

If initial certification is desired, see adviser.


Timeline for Completion

1st Year of Graduate Training

FallSpringSummer
  • Education Core (3 hours)
  • ECT 6791 Research in Career ED (3 hours) or Elective (3 hours)
  • Elective (3 hours)
  • Education Core (3 hours)
  • ECW6666 Issues or ECW 6067 History of Career ED (3 hours)
  • Elective (3 hours)
  • Education Core (3 hours)
  • Elective/Specialization (3 hours)
  • Elective (3 hours)
Semester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 9 credit hours

2nd Year of Graduate Training

FallSpring
  • Elective/Specialization (3 hours)
  • Elective/Specialization (3 hours)
  • Elective/Specialization (3 hours)
  • ECW 6666 Issues or ECW 6067 History of Career ED (3 hours)
  • ECT 6946 Internship (6 hours)
Semester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 9 credit hours

Course Assignments

Faculty listed below coordinate these courses; assignments to teach the course may vary by semester.

FallSpringSummer
ECW 6105
Vocational Program Planning, Development, and Evaluation
Whiteman - 3cr
Even Years‡
ECW 6067
History of Career Education in the U.S.
Whiteman - 3cr
Odd Years†
 
ECT 6791
Research in Career Education
Whiteman - 3cr
Odd Years†
ECW 6666
Issues in Career Education
Whiteman- 3cr
Even Years‡
 
ECW 5265
Cooperative Programs in Vocational Education
Whiteman - 3cr
Even Years‡
ECW 6206
Supervision in Vocational Education
Snider - 3 cr
BTE 6935
Seminar in Business Education
Whiteman - 3cr
ECW 6695 
School/Community Relations for Vocational Education
Snider - 3 cr
ECW 6205
Administration in Vocational Education
Snider - 3 cr
 
ECW 5207
Management of Vocational Programs
Snider - 3 cr
  
ECW 5561
Student Guidance in the Vocational Program
Snider - 3 cr
  
ECT 6946
Internship (Must be approved by faculty advisor previous semester)
Whiteman - 3, 6cr
ECT 6946
Internship (Must be approved by faculty advisor previous semester)
Whiteman - 3, 6cr
ECT 6946
Internship (Must be approved by faculty advisor previous semester)
Whiteman - 3, 6cr
SKYPE Advising

SKYPE us for face to face sessions
Whiteman
Snider
SKYPE Advising

SKYPE us for face to face sessions
Whiteman
Snider
SKYPE Advising

SKYPE us for face to face sessions
Whiteman
Snider
 

‡ - 2012, 2014, 2016
† - 2011, 2013, 2015



Examination Requirements

Comprehensive Exam

The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to evaluate the student’s mastery of the field of Career and Technical Education. The method and procedure for examination is specified on the student’s plan of study. The application for the comprehensive exam must be signed by the Faculty Advisor and submitted by the student through the Office of Student Affairs, College of Education and Human Performance by the published due date.

The exam is prepared by the Program Coordinator.  A blind copy is reviewed by program faculty. The result of the comprehensive examination will be one of the following:

  • PASS with a recommendation that the student be cleared to receive the degree.
  • FAIL stipulating the conditions that must be met before the student is eligible to take the exam the second time. The comprehensive exam may not be taken more than two times. A review period of not less than 90 days nor more than one year after the student is notified of the results of the first examination is required before a second exam may be completed. The Faculty Advisor or Department Chair may impose conditions for a second exam.

Comprehensive Exam Checklist

Obtain a Comprehensive Exam Application from the Office of Student Services in the College of Education or download a copy at http://education.ucf.edu/grad/docs/GradCompExamApplication.pdf

  • Meet with Faculty Advisor to review audit.
  • Submit a completed Comprehensive Exam Application, including Advisor signature, to the Office of Student Affairs by the published due dates.
  • Make appointment to meet with Graduate Faculty Advisor to prepare for the Comprehensive Exam.
  • The Program Coordinator will mail official Comprehensive Examination results to you two weeks after exam.

Graduate Research

Each course in the Career and Technical Education core focuses on the development of research skills.

ECT6791 – Research in Career Education
This course will focus on the development of critical research skills that are broadly applicable to occupational/career education research. Particular emphasis will be place on the role of peer review on original research. There will be a requirement to write intensively and discuss research findings. A research proposal on an area of interest will be developed.

ECW6067 – History of Career Education in the U.S.
This course will focus on the Federal Legislation, Associations & Organizations, People & Places, Sociological & Economic Factors and specialization subject areas of each student.  There will be a requirement to write intensively and discuss research findings. A final written research project will be developed while focusing in a technical specialization area.

ECW6666 – Issues in Career Education
An "Issues" course is meant to provide opportunities for review of research and discourse about identified issues. At the graduate level courses should offer opportunities to write intensively, in preparation for comprehensive examinations, thus becoming a relative "expert" in a selected area. Four issue areas have been identified:

  1. curricular, 
  2. instructional, 
  3. demographic, and 
  4. trends

While very broad categories; delving into these topics will provide skill in reviewing research, summarizing results, and defending your position on the issues. These activities, using course mail and forum interactions, are designed for flexibility and opportunity to address more specific areas of your interest and professional responsibility within the broad issue areas.

For information on research and centers in the College of Education and Human Performance visit the Center for Educational Research and Development (CERD)  webpage on the College of Education and Human Performance website.

Financial Support

 For information regarding financial assistance opportunities for College of Education and Human Performance students including assistantships, fellowships and scholarships, visit the Financial Assistance and Scholarships webpage on the College of Education and Human Performance website.

Graduate Student Associations

For information on graduate student associations for graduate students in the College of Education and Human Performance visit the Clubs and Organizations webpage on the College of Education and Human Performance website.

Graduate Student Association

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is UCF’s graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students’ personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu.

Professional Development

The internship is an independent learning activity that takes place in face-to-face or web-based authentic settings in which students must apply, reflect upon, and refine knowledge and skills acquired in the program. The internship experience gives students full control of the operational setting where they are placed (e.g., such as primary face-to-face or web classroom teacher while being observed and mentored by a supervising teacher and UCF faculty member).

For more information visit the Office of Clinical Experiences webpage on the College of Education and Human Performance website.

Pathways to Success Workshops

Coordinated by the College of Graduate Studies, the Pathways to Success program offers free development opportunities for graduate students including workshops in Academic Integrity, Graduate Grantsmanship, Graduate Teaching, Personal Development, Professional Development, and Research. For more information and how to register, please visit www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/pathways/

Job Search

For more information on employment opportunities visit the Employment webpage on the College of Education and Human Performance website.

Career Services and Experiential Learning

UCF’s Career Services department offers a wide range of programs and services designed to assist graduate students. These services include evaluation and exploration of career goals, preparation for the job search and job search resources. To learn more, visit their website at www.career.ucf.edu

Forms

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s work and presenting it as your own. Any ideas, data, text, media or materials taken from another source (either written or verbal) must be fully acknowledged.a) A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without acknowledgment.b) A student must give credit to the originality of others whenever:

  1. Directly quoting another person's actual words, whether oral or written;
  2. Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theories;
  3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others, whether oral or written;
  4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
  5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgment.

When using the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, students must give credit to the original source at the location or place in the document where that source's material is found as well as provide bibliographic information at the end of the document. When students are verbally discussing the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, they must give credit to the original source at the time they speak about that source. In this manner, students must make clear (so there is no doubt) within their written or verbal materials, which parts are gained from other sources, and which are their own original ideas, theories, formulas, graphics, and pictures.The Office of Student Conduct has a set of criteria that determines if students are in violation of plagiarism. This set of criteria may be set to a higher standard in graduate programs. Therefore, a student may not be found in violation of plagiarism by the Office of Student Conduct, but a professor or program requiring higher standards of attribution and citation may find a student in violation of plagiarism and administer program level sanctions. The standard in doctoral programs should be the highest as students earning these degrees are expected to be experts in their fields and producing independent work that contributes knowledge to their discipline.

Example of Material that has been appropriately cited:

Paraphrased Material

Source: Osborne, Richard, ed. How to Grow Annuals. 2nd ed. Menlo Park: Lane, 1974. Print. Page 24: As a recent authority has pointed out, for a dependable long-blooming swatch of soft blue in your garden, ageratum is a fine choice. From early summer until frost, ageratum is continuously covered with clustered heads of fine, silky, fringed flowers in dusty shades of lavender-blue, lavender-pink or white. The popular dwarf varieties grow in mounds six to twelve inches high and twelve inches across; they make fine container plants. Larger types grow up to three feet tall. Ageratum makes an excellent edging.

Use and Adaptation of the Material:

You can depend on ageratum if you want some soft blue in your garden. It blooms through the summer and the flowers, soft, small, and fringed, come in various shades of lavender. The small varieties which grow in mounds are very popular, especially when planted in containers. There are also larger varieties. Ageratum is good as a border plant (Osborne 24).

Explanation:

The writer has done a good job of paraphrasing what could be considered common knowledge (available in a number of sources), but because the structure and progression of detail is someone else’s, the writer has acknowledged the source. This the writer can do at the end of the paragraph since he or she has not used the author’s words.

The above example was provided by Northwestern University.

Northwestern University, Sept. 2016. “Academic Integrity: A Basic Guide.” Accessed 20 September 2017.

For more information about Academic Honesty, Click here.

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