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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2017-2018

Program Info

Last Updated 2015-06-16

Biotechnology MS



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

The Master of Science in Biotechnology Program (Thesis) consists of a minimum of 30 semester credit hours of graduate courses offered by the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences in the College of Medicine that includes 21 credit hours minimum of required courses, 3 credits of restricted electives, and 6 credit hours of thesis research as detailed below.

What makes this program unique is the focus on practical training offered to graduate students through master’s thesis research in molecular biotechnology to perform jobs in laboratory environment that require scientific talent.

The Professional Science Master's track in Biotechnology (PSM) consists of 42 credit hours of graduate courses offered by the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences in the College of Medicine, including 15 credit hours of required courses and graduate seminar, 9 credit hours of restricted electives, 12 credit hours of professional content courses, and 6 credit hours of an internship as detailed below.

What makes this program unique is the focus on practical training offered to graduate students through biotechnology laboratory courses and internship in a laboratory environment that requires understanding of scientific concepts. 

Students have the option to obtain a Graduate Certificate in Technology Ventures through the completion of their professional courses.

Speak Exam

International graduate students who are required to take the Speak exam must take the OCI (Oral Communications for Internationals) course during their initial semester if they score below 50 on the Speak exam. The course is provided free if students enroll the semester that they fail to pass the Speak Exam.  Students will retake the Speak exam after completion of the course. Students who delay taking this course will be responsible for the cost.

Lab and Safety Training

All Graduate Students are required to complete the following Lab and Safety Training Courses below. If you missed the scheduled training sessions during Orientation week, you must contact the Environmental Health and Training Office to reschedule. www.ehs.ucf.edu

  • Laboratory Safety
  • Radiation Safety
  • Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Biosafety/Biomedical Waste

Curriculum

The Master of Science in Biotechnology program consists of a minimum of 30 semester credit hours of graduate courses offered by the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences in the College of Medicine that includes 21 credit hours minimum of required courses, 3 credits of restricted electives, and 6 credit hours of thesis research as detailed below.


What makes this program unique is the focus on practical training offered to graduate students through master’s thesis research in molecular biotechnology to perform jobs in laboratory environment that require scientific talent.  

Required Courses—21 Credit Hours Minimum

Core—19 Credit Hours Minimum

Students must take the following courses plus at least two credit hours of graduate seminar.

  • MCB 5722C Methods in Biotechnology (4 credit hours) or BSC 6407C Laboratory Methods in Molecular Biology (3 credit hours)
  • BSC 6432 Structure-Function-Relationships of Biomedical Sciences I (5 credit hours)
  • BSC 6433 Structure-Function-Relationships of Biomedical Sciences II (5 credit hours)
  • BSC 6431 Practice of Biomedical Sciences (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5527 Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (3 credit hours) or one of the following: BSC 5418 Tissue Engineering (3 credit hours), MCB 6417C Microbial Metabolism (3 credit hours), PCB 5025 Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology (3 credit hours)

Graduate Seminars—2 Credit Hours

Students will participate in at least two graduate seminar courses that will prepare them for making professional presentations with emphasis in biotechnology. The courses will involve participation of speakers from the biotechnology industry with emphasis on an industrial perspective on biotechnology applications and product development.

  • MCB 5314 Industrial Perspectives Seminar (1 credit hour) or MCB 6938 (1 credit hour,1 semester only)

Elective Courses—3 Credit Hours

Students will select three credit hours of restricted electives from the list below.

  • BSC 5418 Tissue Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • BSC 5436 Biomedical Informatics: Structure Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • BSC 6407C Laboratory Methods in Molecular Biology (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 5127 Foundation of Bio-Imaging Science (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5205 Infectious Processes (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5208 Cellular Microbiology: Host-Pathogen Interactions (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5209 Microbial Stress Response (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5225 Molecular Biology of Disease (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5415 Cellular Metabolism (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5505 Molecular Virology (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5654 Applied Microbiology (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5722C Methods in Biotechnology (4 credit hours)
  • MCB 5932 Current Topics in Molecular Biology (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 6226 Molecular Diagnostics (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 6417C Microbial Metabolism (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5527 Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5025 Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5236 Tumor Biology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5238 Immunobiology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5596 Biomedical Informatics: Sequence Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5709C Laboratory Virtual Simulations in Physiology (2 credit hours)
  • PCB 5834C Advanced Human Physiology (4 credit hours)
  • PCB 5937 Special Topics: Human Endocrinology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 6528 Plant Molecular Biology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 6595 Regulation of Gene Expression (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5838 Cellular and Molecular Basis of Brain Functions (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5265 Stem Cell Biology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5025 Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5815 Molecular Aspects of Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolism (3 credit hours)
  • ZOO 5745C Essentials of Neuroanatomy (4 credit hours)
  • ZOO 5748C Clinical Neuroanatomy (5 credit hours)
  • GEB 5516 Technological Entrepreneurship (3 credit hours)
  • Others: If approved by the Graduate Committee

Thesis—6 Credit Hours

Students will take a minimum of six credits of thesis research (MCB 6971) to complete their research and submit their thesis specializing in biotechnology research. Students are expected to have an in-depth discussion with at least three faculty members before choosing a laboratory for thesis research. The student and the Thesis Adviser/Major Professor will jointly recommend an advisory committee comprised of at least three members. The committee composition must reflect expertise relevant to the student’s thesis research and must be approved by the Graduate Committee. Students switching to change the composition of the Thesis Advisory Committee must also obtain approval from the Graduate Committee.

Thesis Proposal

The thesis proposal defense requirement should be met and passed successfully no later than the end of the summer of the first year in the program. Students will not be allowed to register for courses for the Fall semester of their second year until this requirement is fulfilled. The Thesis Proposal requirement includes: 1) a written 5-page thesis proposal; 2) a thesis proposal defense in front of the thesis committee; and 3) questions by the thesis committee to test the student's understanding of the basic concepts in the field and relevant applications. The student will be evaluated on performance in all three sections. Should the student fail, a second opportunity will be provided within 2 weeks of the first attempt. A second failure will result in dismissal from the program.

An oral thesis defense is required. The defense will be in the format of:

  • A 50-minute presentation of the thesis work, including a 5-minute introduction
  • A 10-minute free period for the general audience to ask questions
  • A 1-hour closed-door examination by the Thesis Advisory Committee and the program faculty present

The thesis should be of significant scope and depth such that the work has made advances in the area of biotechnology. The MS thesis research must generate sufficient quantity and quality data to support the submission of a minimum of one manuscript. Approval of the final thesis will require consent from the majority of the Program Faculty who choose to review the thesis, inclusive of the Thesis Advisory Committee. Faculty members with dissenting vote on the thesis must provide written justification. Scientific journal review criteria will be used as guidelines by the faculty to evaluate the final thesis for its appropriateness for publication in the target journal.

Students will be evaluated on the progress in thesis research by the thesis advisory committee for fall and spring. Two consecutive unsatisfactory evaluations will result in dismissal from the program.

Comprehensive Examination

Students must pass a comprehensive exam to qualify for the Master of Science degree.

Students must successfully pass an oral comprehensive examination to test the understanding of the basic concepts in the field and relevant applications. The Comprehensive Examination will be conducted during the thesis proposal defense. The exam will be administered by the thesis committee. Should the student fail this exam, a second opportunity will be provided within 2 weeks of the first attempt. A second failure will result in dismissal from the program.  


Track Curriculum: Professional Science Master's



The Professional Science Master's (PSM) track in Biotechnology consists of 42 credit hours of graduate courses offered by the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences in the College of Medicine, including 15 credit hours of required courses and graduate seminar, 9 credit hours of restricted electives, 12 credit hours of professional content courses, and 6 credit hours of an internship as detailed below.

What makes this program unique is the focus on practical training offered to graduate students through biotechnology laboratory courses and internship in a laboratory environment that requires understanding of scientific concepts. The program is designed for individuals who desire to work in health and science-based professions or government careers, where workforce needs are increasing. 

Students have the option to obtain a Graduate Certificate in Technology Ventures.

Required Courses—15 Credit Hours Minimum

Core—13 Credit Hours Minimum

  • IDS 5127 Foundation of Bio-Imaging Science (3 credit hours)
  • BSC 6431 Practice of Biomedical Sciences (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5722C Methods in Biotechnology (4 credit hours)
  • PCB 5527 Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (3 credit hours) or one of the following: BSC 5418 Tissue Engineering (3 credit hours), MCB 6417C Microbial Metabolism (3 credit hours), PCB 5025 Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology (3 credit hour)

Graduate Seminar—2 Credit Hours

Students will participate in at least two graduate seminar courses. These seminar courses will prepare students for making professional presentations with emphasis in biotechnology and will involve participation of speakers from the biotechnology industry, with emphasis on an industrial perspective on biotechnology applications and product development.

  • MCB 5314 Industrial Perspectives Seminar (1 credit hour minimum) or MCB 6938 (1 credit hour, 1 semester only)

Elective Courses—9 Credit Hours

Students will select 9 credit hours of restricted electives from the list below.

  • BSC 5418 Tissue Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • BSC 5436 Biomedical Informatics: Structure Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • CHS 6535 Forensic Molecular Biology (3 credit hours)
  • CHS 6535L Forensic Analysis of Biological Materials (3 credit hours)
  • CHS 6536 Forensic Analysis of DNA Data (2 credit hours)
  • GEB 5516 Technological Commercialization (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5205 Infectious Processes (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5209 Microbial Stress Response (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5225 Molecular Biology of Disease (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5415 Cellular Metabolism (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5505 Molecular Virology (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 5932 Current Topics in Molecular Biology (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 6226 Molecular Diagnostics (3 credit hours)
  • MCB 6417C Microbial Metabolism (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5236 Tumor Biology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5238 Immunobiology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5275 Signal Transduction Mechanisms (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5527 Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5596 Biomedical Informatics: Sequence Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5834C Advanced Human Physiology (4 credit hours)
  • PCB 5709C Laboratory Virtual Simulations in Physiology (2 credit hours)
  • PCB 5937 Special Topics: Human Endocrinology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 6528 Plant Molecular Biology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5838 Cellular and Molecular Basis of Brain Functions (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5265 Stem Cell Biology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5025 Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology (3 credit hours)
  • PCB 5815 Molecular Aspects of Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolism (3 credit hours)
  • ZOO 5745C Essentials of Neuroanatomy (4 credit hours)
  • Others: If approved by Graduate Committee 

Professional Courses—12 Credit Hours

Students are required to take 12 credit hours from the following courses to better equip them to administer the business aspects of biotechnology programs and laboratories. 

  • COM 6047 Interpersonal Support in the Workplace (3 credit hours)
  • COM 6145 Organizational Communication (3 credit hours)
  • COM 6046 Interpersonal Communication (3 credit hours)
  • ENC 5237 Writing for the Business Professional (3 credit hours)
  • MAN 6448 Conflict Resolution and Negotiation (3 credit hours)
  • MAN 6305 Human Resources Management (3 credit hours)
  • MAR 6466 Strategic Supply Chain Management (3 credit hours)
  • PAD 6142 Nonprofit Organizations (3 credit hours)
  • PAD 6397 Managing Emergencies and Crises (3 credit hours)
  • GEB 6115 Entrepreneurship (3 credit hours)
  • GEB 5516 Technological Entrepreneurship (3 credit hours) *
  • GEB 6518 Strategic Innovation (3 credit hours) *
  • GEB 6116 Business Plan Formation (3 credit hours) (PR: GEB 6115 or GEB 6518) *
  • Others (Must be approved by Program Coordinator)

Students who successfully complete the three GEB courses designated with an asterisk mark (*) are eligible to receive the 9-credit-hour Graduate Certificate in Technology Ventures. These three courses focus on the successful development of the knowledge and skills needed to commercialize science and technology research. Those students interested in business opportunities enabled by scientific and technological innovations will find the coursework involving intellectual property issues, innovation commercialization processes, technology business strategies and business plan formation invaluable to their success. 

Students desiring to obtain the Graduate Certificate in Technology Ventures must apply for the certificate program prior to enrolling in the third GEB course in order to be awarded the graduate certificate.

Internship— 6 Credit Hours

  • MCB 6946 (6 credit hours)
Internship is a key element of the Biotechnology PSM Program. This program is designed to give students hands-on experience in the Biotechnology industry setting, while making professional connections for the future. There are a variety of internship opportunities for students to be placed with biotechnology companies, state and federal agencies, or nonprofit organizations. Upon the conclusion of the internship, the student must submit a report signed by the Internship Supervisor/Faculty Adviser. Students will take a minimum of six credits of internship to complete their studies in a biotechnology setting. 

Additionally, all students pursuing the Professional Science Master's must enroll in the following course:

  • IDS 5949 Co-op Ed/Work Experience (0 credit hours)

Students must register for IDS 6946 and IDS 5949 simultaneously. Students must complete the course with a satisfactory (S) grade. If the student does not complete the course with a satisfactory grade, the student will be asked to repeat the course to meet program requirements.


Timeline for Completion

MS Biotechnology (Thesis)

Year 1

FallSpringSummer
  • BSC 6432 Structure Function Relationship of Biomedical Sciences (5)
  • MCB 5722C Methods in Biotech (4) - *MCB 6407C Lab Methods in Molecular Biology (3)
  • Research: Students should be talking to faculty members regarding research interest and finding a mentor (deadline is September 30 to final lab to start thesis-work)
 
  • BSC 6433 Structure-Function-Relationship of Biomedical Sciences II (5)
  • MCB 6938 Seminar (1)
  • Elective (3)
  • Research: Complete Plan of Study 
  • Select Thesis Committee 

    Initiate Thesis Work 

 
  • MCB 6971 Thesis (6)
  • Thesis Proposal/Comprehensive Exam: Student must pass exam to be eligible for registration during year two.
  • Thesis Research Proposal 
  • Thesis Committee Meeting 
 
Semester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 6 credit hours

Year 2

FallSpringSummer
  • BSC 6431 Practice of Biomedical Sciences (3)
  • MCB 6971 Thesis (2)
  • MCB5314 Seminar (1)
  • PCB 5527 (3) -*BSC 5418 (3), MCB 6417C (3), PCB 5052 (3)
 
  • MCB 6971 Thesis (3)
  • Research: Continuation of thesis research
 
  • MCB 6971 Thesis (3)
  • Research: Continuation of thesis research
  • Thesis committee meeting to assess progress 
 
Semester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 3 credit hoursSemester Total: 3 credit hours

MS Biotechnology (PSM) 

Year 1

FallSpringSummer
  • MCB 5722C Methods in Biotech (4)
  • PCB 5527 (3) - *BSC 5418 (3), MCB 6417C (3), PCB 5052 (3)
  • MCB 5314 Seminar (1)
  • *Optional – Additional Courses (Prof/Elective) may be added 

 
  • IDS 5127  (3)
  • Elective 1 (3)
  • Elective 2 (3)
  • *Optional –Additional Courses (Prof/Elective) may be added 

 
  • Internships
  • MCB 6496 (6)
Semester Total: 8 credit hours     Semester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 6 credit hours

Year 2

FallSpringSummer
  • BSC 6431 (3)
  • Elective 3 (3)
  • MCB 5314 Seminar (1)
  • *Optional – Additional Courses (Prof/Elective) may be added 

 

Professional Courses: 

  • Prof Course 1 (3)
  • Prof Course 2 (3)
  • Prof Course 3 (3) 

*Optional –Additional Courses (Prof/Elective) may be added 

  • Prof Course 4 (3) 
 
Semester Total: 7 credit hoursSemester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 3 credit hours

Students are required to complete a Plan of Study specifying course degree requirements.

Examination Requirements

MS Biotechnology Thesis Proposal

The proposal defense requirement should be met and passed successfully no later than the end of the summer of the first year in the program. Students will not be allowed to register for courses for the Fall semester of their second year until this requirement is fulfilled. The Thesis Proposal requirement includes: 1) a written 5-page thesis proposal 2) a thesis proposal defense in front of the thesis committee   3) questions by the thesis committee to test the student understanding of the basic concepts in the field and relevant applications. The student will be evaluated on performance in all three sections. Should the student fail, a second opportunity will be provided within 2 weeks of the first attempt. A second failure will result in dismissal from the program.

MS Biotechnology Thesis Defense Exam

An oral thesis defense is required. The defense will be in the format of:

  • A 50-minute presentation of the thesis work, including a 5-minute introduction
  • A 10-minute free period for the general audience to ask questions
  • A 1-hour closed-door examination by the Thesis Advisory Committee and the program faculty present

The thesis should be of significant scope and depth such that the work has made advances in the area of biomedical science. The MS thesis research must generate sufficient quantity and quality data to support the submission of a minimum of one manuscript. Approval of the final thesis will require consent from the majority of the Program Faculty who choose to review the thesis, inclusive of the Thesis Advisory Committee. Faculty members with dissenting vote on the thesis must provide written justification. Scientific journal review criteria will be used as guidelines by the faculty to evaluate the final thesis for its appropriateness for publication in the target journal.

Students will be evaluated on the progress in thesis research by the thesis advisory committee for fall and spring. Two consecutive unsatisfactory evaluations will result in dismissal from the program.

Comprehensive Examination

Students must pass a comprehensive exam to qualify for the Master of Science degree.

All thesis students must successfully pass an oral comprehensive examination to test the understanding of the basic concepts in the field and relevant applications. The Comprehensive Exam will be conducted during thesis proposal defense and will be administered by the thesis committee. Should the student fail, a second opportunity will be provided within 2 weeks of the first attempt. A second failure will result in dismissal from the program.

Thesis Requirements

University Thesis Requirements>

The College of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation page contains information on the university’s requirements for dissertation formatting, format review, defenses, final submission, and more. A step-by-step completion guide is also available at Completing Your Thesis or Dissertation .

All university deadlines are listed in the Academic Calendar. Your program or college may have other earlier deadlines; please check with your program and college staff for additional deadlines.

The following requirements must be met by thesis/dissertation students in their final term:

  • Submit a properly formatted file for initial format review by the format review deadline
  • Submit the Thesis and Dissertation Release Option form well before the defense
  • Defend by the defense deadline
  • Receive format approval (if not granted upon initial review)
  • Submit signed approval form by final submission deadline
  • Submit final dissertation document by final submission deadline

Students must format their dissertation according to the standards outlined at Formatting the ETD. Formatting questions or issues can be submitted to the Format Help page in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. Format reviews and final submission must be completed in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. The Dissertation Approval Form is also available in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site.

The College of Graduate Studies offers several thesis and dissertation Workshops each term. Students are highly encouraged to attend these workshops early in the dissertation process to fully understand the above policies and procedures.

The College of Graduate Studies thesis and dissertation office is best reached by email at editor@ucf.edu.

Report

MS Biotechnology Internship Report (PSM)

Internship—6 Credit Hours

Internship is a key element of the Biotechnology PSM Program. This program is designed to give students hands-on experience in the Biotechnology industry setting; while making professional connections for the future. There are a variety of internship opportunities for students to be placed with biotechnology companies, state and federal agencies, or nonprofit organizations.

Upon the conclusion of the internship, the student must submit a report signed by the Internship Supervisor/Faculty Advisor.

Students will take a minimum of six credits of internship to complete their studies in a biotechnology setting.

Graduate Certificate in Technology Ventures

MS Biotechnology (PSM) students have the option to obtain a Graduate Certificate in Technology Ventures. See Program Curriculum.

Graduate Research

Policy Regarding Research Materials and Dissertation Approval

UCF has three fundamental responsibilities with regard to graduate student research. They are to (1) support an academic environment that stimulates the spirit of inquiry, (2) develop the intellectual property stemming from research, and (3) disseminate the intellectual property to the general public. Students are responsible for being informed of rules, regulations and policies pertaining to research. Below are some general policies and resources.

Research Policies and Ethics Information: UCF's Office of Research & Commercialization ensures the UCF community complies with local, state and federal regulations that relate to research. For polices including required Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval when conducting research involving human subjects (e.g. surveys), animal research, conflict of interest and general responsible conduct of research, please see their website: www.research.ucf.edu > Compliance.

UCF’s Patent and Invention Policy: In most cases, UCF owns the intellectual property developed using university resources. The graduate student as inventor will according to this policy share in the proceeds of the invention. Please see the current UCF Graduate Catalog for details: www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu > Policies > General Graduate Policies.

Policy Statement on Academic Integrity

Since integrity is such a critical part of science and scientific training, any incident of cheating or other forms of academic misconduct by biomedical sciences graduate students may result in dismissal from the MS Program.  The MS program in Biomedical Sciences, as well as all the graduate programs organized in the Burnett School of Biomedical Science, holds students to the highest standards of academic conduct and scientific conduct.

There are many forms of misconduct, both in academics and in science. In science these primarily include the falsification or fabrication of data during one’s research project, or the plagiarism of text, figures or data from another’s work (such as a published paper). All are misconduct, and other examples of misconduct will be discussed during the ethics portion of the course required of all students (Practice in Biomedical Science).

In academics, the unauthorized use of electronic devices during exams, or any other means to gain an advantage during an examination would also be considered an example of academic misconduct. The use of another student’s work who previously took a course would also be considered academic misconduct. Both the student who supplied such material and the student who attempts to use such material are both in violation of the standards.

Many other examples exist and common sense should dictate to the student what is and is not permissible. If you question whether an action could be considered misconduct (academic or scientific) – ask the MS program coordinator or BSBS director. Ignorance of what constitutes misconduct is not an excuse. 

Disciplinary Actions

The MS program reserves the right to carry out full disciplinary action against student misconduct. Any documented case of scientific or academic misconduct represents immediate grounds for removal from the program. The incident will be reported to the student’s PI, the Graduate Committee, and the UCF Office of Student Misconduct.  The Graduate Committee will have the authority to dismiss the student from the MS Program after reviewing the case.

For information on research in the discipline, visit the Research webpage  on the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences website .

Financial Support

For information regarding financial support for students in the Biotechnology program, visit the Scholarship Opportunities webpage on the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences website .

Graduate Student Associations

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is UCF's graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students' personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu. For individual department or graduate program organizations, please see program advisor.

Professional Development

Pathways to Success Workshops 

Coordinated by the College of Graduate Studies, the Pathways to Success program offers free development opportunities for graduate students including workshops in Academic Integrity, Graduate Grantsmanship, Graduate Teaching, Personal Development, Professional Development, and Research. For more information and how to register, please visit www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/pathways/.

Job Search

For positions available in this program visit the Job Opportunities webpage on the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences website.

UCF’s Career Services department offers a wide range of programs and services designed to assist graduate students. These services include evaluation and exploration of career goals, preparation for the job search and job search resources. To learn more, visit their website at www.career.ucf.edu.

Forms

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s work and presenting it as your own. Any ideas, data, text, media or materials taken from another source (either written or verbal) must be fully acknowledged.a) A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without acknowledgment.b) A student must give credit to the originality of others whenever:

  1. Directly quoting another person's actual words, whether oral or written;
  2. Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theories;
  3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others, whether oral or written;
  4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
  5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgment.

When using the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, students must give credit to the original source at the location or place in the document where that source's material is found as well as provide bibliographic information at the end of the document. When students are verbally discussing the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, they must give credit to the original source at the time they speak about that source. In this manner, students must make clear (so there is no doubt) within their written or verbal materials, which parts are gained from other sources, and which are their own original ideas, theories, formulas, graphics, and pictures.The Office of Student Conduct has a set of criteria that determines if students are in violation of plagiarism. This set of criteria may be set to a higher standard in graduate programs. Therefore, a student may not be found in violation of plagiarism by the Office of Student Conduct, but a professor or program requiring higher standards of attribution and citation may find a student in violation of plagiarism and administer program level sanctions. The standard in doctoral programs should be the highest as students earning these degrees are expected to be experts in their fields and producing independent work that contributes knowledge to their discipline.

Example of Material that has been appropriately cited:

Paraphrased Material

Source: Osborne, Richard, ed. How to Grow Annuals. 2nd ed. Menlo Park: Lane, 1974. Print. Page 24: As a recent authority has pointed out, for a dependable long-blooming swatch of soft blue in your garden, ageratum is a fine choice. From early summer until frost, ageratum is continuously covered with clustered heads of fine, silky, fringed flowers in dusty shades of lavender-blue, lavender-pink or white. The popular dwarf varieties grow in mounds six to twelve inches high and twelve inches across; they make fine container plants. Larger types grow up to three feet tall. Ageratum makes an excellent edging.

Use and Adaptation of the Material:

You can depend on ageratum if you want some soft blue in your garden. It blooms through the summer and the flowers, soft, small, and fringed, come in various shades of lavender. The small varieties which grow in mounds are very popular, especially when planted in containers. There are also larger varieties. Ageratum is good as a border plant (Osborne 24).

Explanation:

The writer has done a good job of paraphrasing what could be considered common knowledge (available in a number of sources), but because the structure and progression of detail is someone else’s, the writer has acknowledged the source. This the writer can do at the end of the paragraph since he or she has not used the author’s words.

The above example was provided by Northwestern University.

Northwestern University, Sept. 2016. “Academic Integrity: A Basic Guide.” Accessed 20 September 2017.

For more information about Academic Honesty, Click here.

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