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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2017-2018

Program Info

Last Updated 2014-03-13

Applied Learning and Instruction MA



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Curriculum

The Applied Learning and Instruction MA (ALIMA) program requires a minimum of 33 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree including 15 credit hours of core courses, 12 credit hours of specialization, and 6 credit hours of a research component. The research component can be completed by choosing the thesis or nonthesis option, which requires a 6 credit hour Capstone research course.   The program of study can be tailored to meet the specific needs of each student. The degree program can be completed in mixed mode (M) or fully online (W) formats.

In addition to the course work, students are expected to meet the Continuous Attendance policy for graduate students. Please see the Continuous Attendance and Special Leave of Absence policies in the Graduate Catalog.

Required Courses—27 Credit Hours

Core—15 Credit Hours

  • EDF 6481 Fundamentals of Graduate Research in Education (3 credit hours)
  • EDP 6213 Applied Learning and Instruction Seminar I (3 credit hours)
  • EDP 6217 Applied Learning and Instruction Seminar II (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6216 Motivation in Learning and Performance (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6155 Lifespan Human Development and Learning (3 credit hours)

Specialization—12 Credit Hours

Students have the choice of taking specialization courses in multiple areas. Specialization courses may be taken within one specialization, or from multiple specializations. The purpose of this choice is to provide course offerings which appeal to student interest, but concurrently facilitate depth of knowledge in a particular discipline.

The student, program director and student advisers together determine a course of study to meet the student’s needs while simultaneously developing core knowledge in a specific area with the adviser’s approval. In addition, the adviser may approve courses taken as part of a UCF certificate program for this area of the MA (up to 12 credit hours). The adviser must approve all specialization courses.

Psychological Foundations*
  • DEP 5057 Developmental Psychology (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6259 Learning Theories Applied to Classroom Instruction and Management (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6141 Human Intelligence (3 credit hours)
  • SPS 6225 Behavioral and Observational Analysis of Classroom Interactions in Schools (3 credit hours)
  • SPS 6700 Advanced Educational Psychology (3 credit hours)
  • EGC 6431 Guiding Human Relations I (3 credit hours)
  • EGC 6432 Guiding Human Relations II (3 credit hours)
Business/Training*
  • INP 6317 Organizational Psychology and Motivation (3 credit hours)
  • PSY 6216C Advanced Research Methodology I (3 credit hours)
  • MAN 6245 Organizational Behavior and Development (3 credit hours)
  • MAN 6285 Change Management (3 credit hours)
Instructional Design*
  • EME 6607 Planned Change in Instructional Technology (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6602 Integrating Technology into Curriculum (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6601 Instructional Simulation Design (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6457 Distance Education (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6507 Multimedia For Learning I (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6613 Instructional Systems Design (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6405 Application Software (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6614 Instructional Game Design (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6705 Administration of Instructional Systems (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6055 Current Trends in Instructional Technology (3 credit hours)
Teaching*
  • EDF 6237 Principles of Learning and Introduction to Classroom Assessment (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6727 Critical Analysis of Social, Ethical, Legal, and Safety Issues Related to Education (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6415 Principles of Instruction and Classroom Management (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6233 Analysis of Classroom Teaching (3 credit hours)
  • ESE 6217 Curriculum Design (3 credit hours)
  • EME 5053 Electronic Resources in Education (3 credit hours)
Program Evaluation*
  • EDF 6401 Statistics for Educational Data (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6432 Measurement and Evaluation in Education (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6285 Evaluation of School Programs (3 credit hours)
  • ESE 6416 Curriculum Evaluation (3 credit hours)

*Other electives to be determined by adviser with program approval.

Thesis Option—6 Credit Hours

  • EDF 6971 Thesis (6 credit hours)

Steps for Completing a Master’s Thesis

  1. Submit a 2–3 page thesis prospectus and preliminary bibliography on a topic to their thesis adviser. Prior to enrollment into thesis credit hours, the student will identify a Thesis Committee to be further approved by the College Graduate Dean and the College of Graduate Studies. This committee is chaired by the adviser and includes two or more additional faculty members from the School of Teaching, Learning, and Leadership (minimum of 3 committee members required).
  2. The formal thesis is initiated by the preparation of a proposal that meets both departmental and university requirements for the thesis. The members of the student’s thesis committee review the proposal as the preliminary step to beginning the thesis. Students are responsible for sending their proposal to all committee members at least three weeks before the end of the semester. This committee must approve the Thesis Proposal before academic credit can accrue.
  3. Once the proposal is approved by both the committee and the UCF Institutional Review Board, students should begin collecting and analyzing their data. Students should expect to defend their proposal during the semester in which they are enrolled for thesis credits.
  4. The thesis is a formal written document. The introduction cites similar, related, and antecedent work. The body explains the purposes of the project, the method of its production, and any evaluation that was performed. The conclusion includes plans for future work. The thesis also includes an archival copy of the resulting creative product. Both the thesis and the creative product must be delivered in digital form, acceptable by the College of Graduate Studies and UCF library according to standards for digital dissertations and theses.

Nonthesis Option—6 Credit Hours

Six credit hours of Capstone coursework is required to give the student a foundation in conducting research.

  • EDP 6936 Capstone in Applied Learning and Instruction (6 credit hours)

Scholarly Product Requirement (Review 1)

Before the end of three years in the ALIMA program, students are required to submit evidence of their ability to conduct a scholarly examination of research in a chosen area in the field of educational psychology. They will demonstrate this ability by producing a scholarly review of literature to present a thorough overview of research surrounding a particular problem involving learning and/or instruction. As part of the review, students will present a list of research and theory-based potential solutions to the identified problem. This project will be introduced in the Seminar in Applied Learning and Instruction I and completed the following semester in Seminar in Applied Learning and Instruction II.

Comprehensive Exams (Review II)

The comprehensive exams serve as the culminating experience of the ALIMA program. The comprehensive exam must be completed no later than 30 days before the end of the semester in which the student graduates. 

Nonthesis Option

For students electing not to write a thesis, the comprehensive exam will consist of three questions. The student will have one week to answer the questions in a take-home, extended essay file format. Students must cite all instances where their ideas are directly or indirectly related to outside sources. Students may not consult with other students or use Wikipedia or other online sources to complete their exams. Exams will be graded based on a pass or fail basis. Students who fail the exam marginally may be asked to rewrite specific questions. Students who fail the exam may be requested by their adviser to retake courses in areas of deficiency and will not be eligible to receive their master's degree until the exam is passed.

Thesis Option

For students electing to submit a thesis, their comprehensive exam will take place as an oral exam no less than 3 weeks after the final version of their thesis is submitted to their committee. During the course of the oral exam, students will be asked to defend their thesis, as well as respond to questions that require them to integrate and synthesize information learned in their core courses.


Examination Requirements

Scholarly Product Requirement (Review 1)

Before the end of three years in the ALIMA program, students are required to submit evidence of their ability to conduct a scholarly examination of research in a chosen area in the field of educational psychology. They will demonstrate this ability by producing a scholarly review of literature to present a thorough overview of research surrounding a particular problem involving learning and/or instruction. As part of the review, students will present a list of research and theory-based potential solutions to the identified problem. This project will be introduced in the Seminar in Applied Learning and Instruction I and completed the following semester in Seminar in Applied Learning and Instruction II.

Comprehensive Exams (Review II)

The comprehensive exams serve as the culminating experience of the ALIMA program.

Nonthesis Option

For students electing not to write a thesis, the comprehensive exam will consist of three questions. The student will have one week to answer the questions in a take-home, extended essay file format. Students must cite all instances where their ideas are directly or indirectly related to outside sources. Students may not consult with other students or use Wikipedia or other online sources to complete their exams. Exams will be graded based on a pass, marginal pass, or fail basis. Students who pass the exam marginally may be asked to rewrite specific questions. Students who fail the exam will not be eligible to receive their master's degree.

Thesis Option

For students electing to submit a thesis, their comprehensive exam will take place as an oral exam no less than 3 weeks after the final version of their thesis is submitted to their committee. During the course of the oral exam, students will be asked to defend their thesis, as well as respond to questions that require them to integrate and synthesize information learned in their core courses.

Thesis Requirements

University Thesis Requirements

The College of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation page contains information on the university’s requirements for thesis formatting, format review, defenses, final submission, and more. A step-by-step completion guide is also available at Completing Your Thesis or Dissertation.

All university deadlines are listed in the Academic Calendar. Your program or college may have other earlier deadlines; please check with your program and college staff for additional deadlines.

The following requirements must be met by thesis students in their final term:

  • Submit a properly formatted file for initial format review by the format review deadline
  • Submit the Thesis and Dissertation Release Option form well before the defense
  • Defend by the defense deadline
  • Receive format approval (if not granted upon initial review)
  • Submit signed approval form by final submission deadline
  • Submit final thesis document by final submission deadline

Students must format their thesis according to the standards outlined at Formatting the ETD. Formatting questions or issues can be submitted to the Format Help page in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. Format reviews and final submission must be completed in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. The Thesis Approval Form is also available in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site.

The College of Graduate Studies offers several thesis and dissertation Workshops each term. Students are highly encouraged to attend these workshops early in the thesis process to fully understand the above policies and procedures.

The College of Graduate Studies thesis and dissertation office is best reached by email at editor@ucf.edu.&

Steps for Completing a Master’s Thesis

  1. Submit a 2–3 page thesis prospectus and preliminary bibliography on a topic to their thesis adviser. Prior to enrollment into thesis credit hours, the student will identify a Thesis Committee to be further approved by the College Graduate Dean and the College of Graduate Studies. This committee is chaired by the adviser and includes two or more additional faculty members from the Department of Educational Studies (minimum of 3 committee members required).
  2. The formal thesis is initiated by the preparation of a proposal that meets both departmental and university requirements for the thesis. The members of the student’s thesis committee review the proposal as the preliminary step to beginning the thesis. Students are responsible for sending their proposal to all committee members at least three weeks before the end of the semester. This committee must approve the Thesis Proposal before academic credit can accrue.
  3. Once the proposal is approved by both the committee and the UCF Institutional Review Board, students should begin collecting and analyzing their data. Students should expect to defend their proposal during the semester in which they are enrolled for thesis credits.
  4. The thesis is a formal written document. The introduction cites similar, related, and antecedent work. The body explains the purposes of the project, the method of its production, and any evaluation that was performed. The conclusion includes plans for future work. The thesis also includes an archival copy of the resulting creative product. Both the thesis and the creative product must be delivered in digital form, acceptable by the College of Graduate Studies and UCF library according to standards for digital dissertations and theses.

Graduate Student Associations

For information on graduate student associations for graduate students in the College of Education and Human Performance visit the Clubs and Organizations webpage on the College of Education and Human Performance website.

Graduate Student Association

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is UCF’s graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students’ personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu

Professional Development

Pathways to Success Workshops

Coordinated by the College of Graduate Studies, the Pathways to Success program offers free development opportunities for graduate students including workshops in Academic Integrity, Graduate Grantsmanship, Graduate Teaching, Personal Development, Professional Development, and Research. For more information and how to register, please visit www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/pathways/.  

Job Search

For more information on employment opportunities visit the Employment webpage on the College of Education and Human Performance website.

Career Services and Experiential Learning

UCF’s Career Services department offers a wide range of programs and services designed to assist graduate students. These services include evaluation and exploration of career goals, preparation for the job search and job search resources. To learn more, visit their website at www.career.ucf.edu.

Forms

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s work and presenting it as your own. Any ideas, data, text, media or materials taken from another source (either written or verbal) must be fully acknowledged.a) A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another person without acknowledgment.b) A student must give credit to the originality of others whenever:

  1. Directly quoting another person's actual words, whether oral or written;
  2. Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theories;
  3. Paraphrasing the words, ideas, opinions, or theories of others, whether oral or written;
  4. Borrowing facts, statistics, or illustrative material; or
  5. Offering materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgment.

When using the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, students must give credit to the original source at the location or place in the document where that source's material is found as well as provide bibliographic information at the end of the document. When students are verbally discussing the ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures of another, they must give credit to the original source at the time they speak about that source. In this manner, students must make clear (so there is no doubt) within their written or verbal materials, which parts are gained from other sources, and which are their own original ideas, theories, formulas, graphics, and pictures.The Office of Student Conduct has a set of criteria that determines if students are in violation of plagiarism. This set of criteria may be set to a higher standard in graduate programs. Therefore, a student may not be found in violation of plagiarism by the Office of Student Conduct, but a professor or program requiring higher standards of attribution and citation may find a student in violation of plagiarism and administer program level sanctions. The standard in doctoral programs should be the highest as students earning these degrees are expected to be experts in their fields and producing independent work that contributes knowledge to their discipline.

Example of Material that has been appropriately cited:

Paraphrased Material

Source: Osborne, Richard, ed. How to Grow Annuals. 2nd ed. Menlo Park: Lane, 1974. Print. Page 24: As a recent authority has pointed out, for a dependable long-blooming swatch of soft blue in your garden, ageratum is a fine choice. From early summer until frost, ageratum is continuously covered with clustered heads of fine, silky, fringed flowers in dusty shades of lavender-blue, lavender-pink or white. The popular dwarf varieties grow in mounds six to twelve inches high and twelve inches across; they make fine container plants. Larger types grow up to three feet tall. Ageratum makes an excellent edging.

Use and Adaptation of the Material:

You can depend on ageratum if you want some soft blue in your garden. It blooms through the summer and the flowers, soft, small, and fringed, come in various shades of lavender. The small varieties which grow in mounds are very popular, especially when planted in containers. There are also larger varieties. Ageratum is good as a border plant (Osborne 24).

Explanation:

The writer has done a good job of paraphrasing what could be considered common knowledge (available in a number of sources), but because the structure and progression of detail is someone else’s, the writer has acknowledged the source. This the writer can do at the end of the paragraph since he or she has not used the author’s words.

The above example was provided by Northwestern University.

Northwestern University, Sept. 2016. “Academic Integrity: A Basic Guide.” Accessed 20 September 2017.

For more information about Academic Honesty, Click here.

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